A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news

Aereo Struggles as Supreme Court Finds It Violated Copyright Law
By Jenny Choi – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

On June 25, 2014, in its 6-3 decision, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled against Aereo, Inc.  The U.S. Supreme Court held that Aereo violated the Copyright Act of 1976 for streaming TV shows shortly after they were broadcast without paying for the copyrighted works.  As a result, Aereo suspended its service and has struggled to find a way to re-operate its business. This decision has not come without criticism, however, as some warn this ad hoc decision could lead to uncertainty in the courts.

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Posted On Jul - 23 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

The PCLOB’s Recommendations for a More Reasonable Surveillance Program
By Max Kwon – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

The PCLOB issued a report analyzing the legal and policy implications of Section 702 of the FISA. The Board issued recommendations addressing various concerns, such as targeting and tasking, U.S. person queries, and upstream and “about” collection. Although the Board unanimously concluded that the core program of Section 702 is both reasonable and valuable, the report appears to be largely condemned by civil liberties advocates and scholars.

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Posted On Jul - 14 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

USPTO’s post-Alice guidance on patenting claims involving abstract ideas.
By Max Kwon – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

In response to Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank, the USPTO issued a memorandum stating that it will now require that all claims involving abstract ideas for subject matter eligibility be analyzed under the framework outlined in  Mayo Collaborative Services. Although this approach adopts a single analysis, it remains to be seen whether the test will provide enough guidance to both patentees and courts for determining what qualifies as a patentable claim involving an abstract idea.

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Posted On Jul - 7 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

Supreme Court: Police Officers Need a Warrant to Search an Arrestee’s Cell Phone
By Anton Ziajka – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

On June 25, 2014, the Supreme Court decided that police officers “must generally secure a warrant before conducting . . . a search of the information on a cell phone” seized from an individual who has been arrested. Slip op. at 10. Writing for a unanimous Court, Chief Justice Roberts found that an officer’s search of a cell phone “implicate[s] privacy concerns far beyond those implicated by the search of . . . physical items.” Id. at 17.

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Posted On Jul - 7 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

Eleventh Circuit Finds Cell Site Location Data Requires Warrant
By Sheri Pan – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed in part and vacated in part a jury conviction of Quartavious Davis on charges of robbery, conspiracy, and knowing possession of a firearm in furtherance of a violent crime.  Davis appealed the conviction on the grounds that the court violated his Fourth Amendment rights by admitting cell site location data that was obtained without a search warrant.

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Posted On Jun - 24 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST
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