A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news
By Dr.Jur. Eric Engle LLM[i] Editorial Policy An internet fraudster, a repeat offender, has recently been charged[ii] with “fraud and related activity in connection with computers”[iii] in connection with a financial crime – fraudulent currency trading through phishing.[iv] The defendant obtained the passwords to another person’s internet account and then used that person’s account to trade foreign currency. Interestingly, the indictment[v] uniquely charges the fraudster with a computer crime. The fact pattern, however, raises the interesting question of whether the ... Read More...
Posted On Jan - 7 - 2010 Comments Off READ FULL POST
By Dr. Jur. Eric Engle, LLM[i] Edited by Gary Pong Editorial Policy New technologies have made types of searches possible which could never have been envisioned when the Fourth Amendment was proposed to prohibit unreasonable search and seizure. With remote listening, infrared imaging, and, now, wireless technologies, it is possible to detect movements of people within buildings with no discernible physical impact on the surveilled person’s life.[ii] Are remote searches reasonable? Do they require a warrant?[iii] In my opinion, courts ... Read More...
Posted On Dec - 29 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST
First Circuit Explains Judgment Against File-Sharer Tannenbaum By Eric Engle  – Edited by Miriam Weiler Sony BMG Music Entertainment et al. v. Tannenbaum, Case No. 07cv11446-NG (Dist. Mass., Dec. 7, 2009) Memorandum and Order The U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts elaborated on its July 27 summary judgment against Joel Tannenbaum, holding that file sharing for personal use was not presumptively fair under the Fair Use doctrine.  In so holding, the court suggested that Tannenbaum could have escaped ... Read More...
Posted On Dec - 17 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST
By Eric Engle Prosecutors Drop Controversial “Cyberbullying” Case: Possible Appeal? On November 20, Wired reported that the federal prosecutors in the Lori Drew cyberbullying case did not plan to appeal Drew’s acquittal. The trial judge reversed Drew’s criminal conviction by a jury, holding that criminal penalties for violating a website’s terms of service would be unconstitutional. Although Drew won’t have to further defend against criminal charges for her alleged harassment of a teenage girl who later committed suicide, she might ... Read More...
Posted On Nov - 29 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST
Charges against Craigslist for their “Adult Services” section dismissed by Illinois District Court By Ye (Helen) He – Edited by Eric Engle Dart v. Craigslist, Inc., No. 09 C 1385 (N.D. Ill. Oct. 20, 2009) Opinion The United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois held, on Craigslist’s motion for judgment on the pleadings, that Craigslist is not liable for the content posted by its viewers. The court cited Section 230(c) of the Communications Decency Act, concluding that ... Read More...
Posted On Oct - 24 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST
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