A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news

By Tyler Lacey

RealNetworks Won’t Appeal Decision Declaring Its DVD Copying Software in Violation of DMCA

On March 4, Wired reported that RealNetworks plans to cease litigation of a lawsuit filed by the Motion Picture Association of America (“MPAA”) alleging that its DVD copying software, RealDVD, violates the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”).  RealNetworks had initially planned to appeal a California district court’s decision that the software illegally circumvented the DVD encryption technology, Content Scramble System. However, after two years of litigation, RealNetworks has decided not to appeal in an effort to cut its losses, which according to Wired amount to “millions of dollars, including $4.5 million to reimburse the MPAA for its legal costs.”  Wired argues that “RealNetworks’ admitted defeat solidifies the DMCA’s power.”

Google Obtains Patent on Location-Targeted Advertising Method

Mashable reports that Google obtained a patent for “determining and/or using location information in an ad system” on February 23. The patent, which Mashable characterizes as “broad,” was filed on April 12, 2004.  Mashable also reports that since the patent’s filing date, several companies have started practicing a method of targeting advertisements based on an individual’s location, with AdMob and Quattro Wireless “leading the charge.”  Quattro Wireless has been acquired by Apple, which Mashable notes is “quickly becoming [Google’s] primary rival” in mobile advertising.  The patent abstract states in part that the patented method “may be used in a relevancy determination of an ad” and that “[a]d performance information may be tracked on the basis of location information.”

Canadian Government to Allow Increased Foreign Investment in Telecommunications Industry

On March 4, CBC News reported that the Canadian government is planning to loosen foreign ownership restrictions on telecommunications companies as a part of its new budget proposal.  The new rules will initially allow foreign startups and acquisitions of small companies, and will allow foreign takeovers of larger companies within five years. According to the article, there are currently restrictions in place designed to ensure Canadians are in control of any telecommunications carriers that operate in Canada, including minimum levels of Canadian board membership and ownership of voting shares. Industry experts argue that the old rules are “archaic and anti-competitive,” and are the reason “prices have been high and service levels low.” According to Canada’s Governor General Michaëlle Jean, the new rules will give “Canadian firms access to the funds and expertise they need.”

Posted On Mar - 5 - 2010 Comments Off

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