A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news

By Samantha Rothberg

Icon-newsChinese National Sentenced to 12 Years in U.S. Prison for Selling Pirated Software

Chinese citizen Xiang Li was sentenced to 12 years in a U.S. federal prison for conspiracy to commit wire fraud and criminal copyright infringement, Bloomberg reports. Li operated a website, “Crack 99,” which sold more than $100 million worth of pirated software between 2008 and 2011. He was arrested in Saipan, a U.S. territory, after traveling there to sell software to undercover federal agents. According to prosecutors, Li is the first Chinese national to be “apprehended and prosecuted in the U.S. for cybercrimes he engaged in entirely from China.”

Songwriters’ Rights Group BMI Sues Pandora Over Fee Dispute

Broadcast Music Inc. (“BMI”), an organization that collects royalties on behalf of music publishers and songwriters when their works are played in public, filed suit in federal court against Pandora, the Internet radio service, the Wall Street Journal reports. Earlier this week, Pandora purchased a small radio station in South Dakota and argued that this move entitles it to pay BMI the reduced royalty fees that traditional radio broadcasters pay. BMI decried Pandora’s move as a “brazen effort to artificially drive down its license fees.” The organization sued for a judicial declaration of the rates that Pandora must pay when it plays an artist’s song.

Google Argues Wi-FI is “Radio Signal” in Street View Case

Google urged the Ninth Circuit to overrule a judge’s 2011 finding that its Street View program had violated the federal Wiretap Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510–2522, by collecting private data over unencrypted wi-fi signals, Bloomberg reports. Google argues that transmissions over an open wi-fi signal are equivalent to public radio transmissions, and the interception of a radio transmission or any “form of electronic communication readily accessible to the general public” is not illegal under the Wiretap Act. Attorney Elizabeth Cabraser, who represents the consumers who won the initial ruling, argued that the Wiretap Act exception was intended to protect ham radios used for communicating over long distances, and not wi-fi networks, which are broadcast over very short distances. She urged the court to reject Google’s “attempt to create a loophole to serve its own purposes.”

New York Aims to Crack Down on 3D Gun Printing

A New York city councilman introduced legislation on Wednesday that would make it illegal for anyone other than a licensed gunsmith to manufacture guns using a 3D printer, reports CNET. The bill would require legal manufacturers to register the guns with police within 72 hours of creation. The New York State Legislature and U.S. Congress have both recently introduced similar legislation, and a California state senator has announced plans to do the same. The surge in legislation stems from the worry that untraceable, undetectable plastic guns could be anonymously printed by anyone with a 3D printer and the necessary software. Last month, that vision took a step closer to reality when the non-profit organization Defense Distributed announced that it had created the world’s first 3D-printed handgun, the “Liberator.”

Posted On Jun - 16 - 2013 Comments Off

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