A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news

Icon-newsBy Olga Slobodyanyuk

BP Fails to Trademark the Color Green in Australia

British Petroleum (“BP”) lost its 22-year-old legal battle in Australia to trademark the dark green shade that dominates its logo, reports The Guardian. The governmental agency that administers intellectual property rights, IP Australia, found that BP did not show “convincing evidence” that the fuel company was linked in consumers’ minds with the green shade known as Pantone 348C. According to Corporate Council, despite the failure in Australia, BP has trademarked the color in the UK and Europe, and has protected its use in marketing fuel and service stations in the U.S.

The FTC Sues Amazon over Children’s Purchases in Apps

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a lawsuit against Amazon.com, alleging that the online retailer allowed children to make purchases within apps and online games without their parents’ permission, reports Forbes. The FTC is seeking refunds for consumers for all such purchases, as well as changes to Amazon’s in-app commerce policies, according to The Washington Post. In a public letter to the FTC, Amazon responded that it has consistently improved it’s in-app buying services and has been promptly responding to customer concerns. Forbes reports that Amazon keeps 30% of in-app purchase revenue and keeps all sales final and non-refundable. FTC has investigated similar problems with Apple and had a multimillion dollar settlement with the company earlier this year.

Leaked Code Reveals that NSA is Targeting Users of Privacy Services

An analysis of leaked code used to conduct internet surveillance reveals that users who visit privacy and anonymity websites are targeted by the NSA, reports the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). The code, a tool called Xkeyscore, “fingerprints,” or marks for further investigation, users who access privacy services such as Tor, Tails, HotSpotShield, FreeNet, Centurian, and Linux Journal, a monthly magazine about the open-source operating system (which the NSA labeled as an “extremist forum” for advocating for privacy services use), reports Wired. Privacy services are used by journals, human rights advocates, and political dissidents, among others. According to the general deputy council of the EFF, visiting privacy websites and reading Linux Journal are protected First Amendment activities, essential to freedom of expression, which cannot be targeted under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Posted On Jul - 15 - 2014 Comments Off

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