A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news

By Erin Pritchard

Facebook and Yahoo Settle & Share

Facebook and Yahoo announced last Friday, June 6, that they have settled all patent disputes between the two companies and are entering into an advertising partnership, according to CNN. The companies came to a no-cash exchange settlement agreement by entering into a cross-license deal which allows access to one another’s patent portfolios as well as a new advertising partnership. Yahoo filed a complaint against Facebook in March 2012 in the U.S. District Court in the San Jose Division of the Northern District of California, alleging that Facebook infringed ten of Yahoo’s patents in methods of advertising, privacy controls, and social networking. Just a few weeks later, Facebook then hit back at Yahoo with its own lawsuit the following month. Facebook denied Yahoo’s claims of patent infringement and said that Yahoo had infringed ten Facebook patents.

The Tech IPO Boom Isn’t Over

After the troublesome Facebook IPO last May, market analysts began questioning whether the tech IPO market would die out for at least the near future. But the success of the ServiceNow IPO from two weeks ago has encouraged analysts about the tech IPO market, according to CBSnews. ServiceNow, a provider of cloud-based information technology services, was one of the first technology IPOs since Facebook. ServiceNow’s IPO price was $18 per share and and it closed on the New York Stock Exchange up 37 percent at $24.60, giving the company a valuation of over $2 billion, reported Bloomberg.  After ServiceNow, tech companies may shake off the Facebook IPO scare and jump back into the IPO market.

Kim Dotcom’s Offer to Surrender

Last January, the United States Department of Justice indicted Megaupload for copyright infringement, and then seized and shut down the domain names and the sites associated with Megaupload, as JOLT Digest previously reported. After an arrest in New Zealand last January, there have been efforts to extradite Dotcom and other accused Megaupload employees.  Now, Kim Dotcom and his Megaupload associates are offering to turn themselves in and fly to the United States without an extradition hearing in New Zealand upon the condition that Dotcom receives a fair trial guarantee and return of money to support their families and to pay legal fees, reports Wired.  Last Wednesday, Dotcom tweeted “Hey DOJ, we will go to the US. No need for extradition.  We want bail, funds unfrozen for lawyers & living expenses.”  However, Dotcom claims that the FBI will never take his offer as it can’t win the case against him and Megaupload.

Erin Pritchard is a 3L at Harvard Law School.

 

Posted On Jul - 14 - 2012 Comments Off

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