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Newegg Wins Patent Troll Case After Court Delays

By Kasey Wang – Edited by Yunnan Jiang and Travis West

The District Court for the Eastern District of Texas recently issued a final judgement for online retailer Newegg, twenty months after trial, vacating a $2.3 million jury award for TQP. TQP, a patent assertion entity commonly known as a “patent troll,” collected $45 million in settlements for the patent in question before Newegg’s trial.

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The Evolution of Internet Service Providers from Partners to Adversaries: Tracking Shifts in Interconnection Goals and Strategies in the Internet’s Fifth Generation

By Robert Frieden – Edited by Marcela Viviana Ruiz Martinez, Olga Slobodyanyuk and Yaping Zhang

In respone to increasing attempts by Internet Service Providers to target customers who trigger higher costs for rate increases, the FCC and other regulatory agencies worldwide have stepped in to prevent market failure and anticompetitive practices. This paper will examine new models for the carriage of Internet traffic that have arisen in the wake of these changes.

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The Global Corporate Citizen:  Responding to International Law Enforcement Requests for Online User Data 

By Kate Westmoreland – Edited by Yunnan Jiang

This paper analyses the law controlling when U.S.-based providers can provide online user data to foreign governments. The focus is on U.S. law because U.S. dominance of internet providers means that U.S. laws affect a large number of global users. The first half of this paper outlines the legal framework governing these requests. The second half highlights the gaps in the law and how individual companies’ policies fill these gaps.

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3D Printing, Net Neutrality, and the Internet: Symposium Introduction

By Deborah Beth Medows – Edited by Yaping Zhang

Jurists must widely examine the pervasive challenges among the advents in Internet and computer technology in order to ensure that legal systems protect individuals while  encouraging innovation.  It is precisely due to the legal and societal quagmires that 3D printing and net neutrality pose that ideally position them as springboards from which to delve into broader discussions on technology law.

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A Victory for Compatibility: the Ninth Circuit Gives Teeth to RAND Terms

By Stacy Ruegilin – Edited by Ken Winterbottom

Microsoft won a victory in the Ninth Circuit last Thursday after the court found that Motorola, a former Google subsidiary, had breached its obligation to offer licenses for standards-essential technologies at reasonable and non-discriminatory rates. The court affirmed a $14.52 million jury verdict against Motorola for the breach.

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Interior Minister Ögmundur Jónason Proposes Pornography Ban
By Charlie Stiernberg – Edited by Sarah Jeong

The Associated Press reports that authorities in Iceland are considering a proposal by Interior Minister Ögmundur Jónason to ban pornography on the Internet. Pornography has been illegal in the country for decades, but the law is vague and therefore seldom enforced. The new proposal would not create any new restrictions, but it would reinforce existing law by expressly defining “pornography” as material with violent or degrading content.

Supporters argue the measure would shelter children from violent sexual imagery and serious psychological harm. Opponents claim the move will unduly censor Internet content, undermine Iceland’s international reputation for free speech, and encourage authoritarian regimes abroad.

The Guardian provides an account of the history and research behind the new measure. The Atlantic Wire argues that an effective Internet pornography ban is technologically impossible. The Daily Mail suggests that David Cameron, an outspoken critic of pornography, will be closely monitoring the outcome of the debate, along with others in the U.K. government. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 5 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Michael Hoven

Flash DigestApple v. Samsung Damages Award Cut by $450 Million

Judge Lucy Koh of the Northern District of California, who oversaw last summer’s Apple v. Samsung trial, lowered the jury’s $1.05 billion damages award to apple by $450 million, reports Reuters. According to Koh, the jury used an “impermissible legal theory” to calculate damages. To fix the error, Koh ordered a new damages trial on fourteen of Samsung’s twenty-eight infringing products, to be postponed while the case is in appeal in the Federal Circuit. The decision is the latest of several post-trial victories for Samsung, notes Ars Technica, but the award still stands at $599 million and a new damages trial could add to that figure.

Yelp Review Can Help Show Consumer Confusion

The Middle District of Florida entered a preliminary injunction against the health club Fit U in a trademark infringement suit brought by the gym You Fit, according to the Wall Street Journal Law Blog. In considering You Fit’s claim, the court considered an anonymous Yelp review claiming the reviewer’s own confusion regarding the distinction between You Fit and Fit U. As Internet Cases reports, the court noted that, for a preliminary injunction, it could consider material not admissible for a permanent injunction, but the Yelp review did not constitute hearsay in any case.

ISPs Announce “Copyright Alert System” to Combat Infringement

Several Internet service providers (ISP)—including AT&T, Cablevision Systems, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon—stated that they would initiate a new monitoring and notification program designed to curb copyright infringement, Wired reports. The “Copyright Alert System” will monitor peer-to-peer file-sharing services and, as NBC News reports, implement a six-strike scheme of alerts culminating in service slowdowns or redirects. Record labels and movie studios have lobbied for the plan, which also has the support of the Obama administration.

Drug Testing of Welfare Recipients Likely Violates Fourth Amendment, Says 11th Circuit

The 11th Circuit upheld an injunction against the enforcement of a Florida law requiring drug testing of beneficiaries of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), reported Fox News and Courthouse News Service. Such drug testing was likely to be an unconstitutional search and Florida showed no “substantial special need” for the testing, according to the court, making an injunction appropriate. Despite this, bills that would require random drug testing of TANF beneficiaries were recently introduced in Maine and the United States House of Representatives.

Posted On Mar - 5 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Maryland v. King
By Kathleen McGuinness – Edited by Pio Szamel

Maryland v. King, No. 12-207 (U.S. Feb. 26, 2013)
Transcript of Oral Argument

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Maryland v. King, a challenge to the constitutionality of warrantless DNA sampling of persons arrested for serious crimes. Throughout the hour-long argument, the justices repeatedly jumped in with probing questions over the government’s motivations, the expectations of privacy in DNA, and the future of DNA analysis in law enforcement. If the policy is found to be unconstitutional, twenty-eight other states and the federal government face potential invalidation of similar laws.

SCOTUSBlog, Bloomberg, and ABC News have further coverage. SCOTUSblog also has information about the case’s background and pre-argument predictions. A more detailed analysis of the case is available from the Legal Information Institute. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 4 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Settlement between Zynga and Electronic Arts
By Casey Holzapfel – Edited by Andrew Crocker

Hacked By Over-XThe Chicago Tribune reports that Electronic Arts (EA) and Zynga have reached a settlement agreement regarding competing lawsuits in the Northern District of California. While the details of the settlement were not made public, both parties agreed to drop their respective lawsuits and pay their own legal fees. According to red Orbit, the settlement does not involve compensation from either company.

EA initially filed a complaint against Zynga in August 2012, alleging that Zynga’s game “The Ville” copied EA’s game “The Sims Social” after hiring EA executives who had worked on “The Sims Social.” Six weeks later, Zynga filed its own lawsuit claiming EA had violated a 2011 agreement between the two companies regarding employee solicitation. Zynga accused EA of violating the agreement by attempting to block employees from switching companies. Two of the executives mentioned in EA’s suit for moving to Zynga have left Zynga in the past year.

The Chicago Tribune provides an overview of the events leading to the settlement. The San Francisco Chronicle looks into the details of copyright protection for video games. (more…)

Posted On Feb - 27 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

In re Innovatio IP Ventures
By David LeRay – Edited by Kathleen McGuinness

In re Innovatio IP Ventures, LLC, Case No. 11 C 9308 (N.D. Ill. Feb. 4, 2013)
Slip opinion

The Northern District of Illinois granted in part and denied in part Innovatio IP Ventures’s motion to dismiss seven claims in a complaint brought by manufacturers of wireless Internet technology. The court dismissed the manufacturers’ claims based on the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (“RICO”), 18 U.S.C. §§ 1961-1968, the California Business & Professional Code, a theory of civil conspiracy, a theory of interference with prospective economic advantage, and a theory of unclean hands. The court did not dismiss claims based on breach of contract and promissory estoppel.

The court held that the Noerr-Pennington doctrine protecting petitioners of the government from liability extends to patent law cases in the Seventh Circuit, and specifically applies to pre-suit demand letters under Federal Circuit law unless the defendant is engaging in sham litigation. The court reasoned that the doctrine is “today understood [in the Seventh Circuit] as an application of the first amendment . . . ,” and applies readily beyond its origins in antitrust and labor cases. Innovatio at 9. The court held that the doctrine protected pre-suit communications under the logic of the Federal Circuit’s holding in Globetrotter Software. Id. at 13 (discussing Globetrotter Software, Inc. v. Elan Computer Grp., Inc., 362 F.3d 1367 (Fed. Cir. 2004)).

Ars Technica provides an overview of the case. Wall Street Journal Law Blog and The Patent Examiner discuss its history. (more…)

Posted On Feb - 26 - 2013 1 Comment READ FULL POST
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Newegg

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