A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news
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By Ellora Israni – Edited by Filippo Raso

IMDb is challenging the constitutionality of Assembly Bill 1687 (“AB 1687”), a California law requiring IMDb to remove ages from its website upon request from paid subscribers, claiming that the law violates the First Amendment’s free speech protections.

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Facebook Blocks British Insurance Company from Basing Premiums on Posts and Likes

By Javier Careaga– Edited by Mila Owen

Admiral Insurance has created an initiative called firstcarquote, which analyzes Facebook activity of first-time car owners. The firstcarquote algorithm determines risk based on personality traits and habits that are linked to safe driving. Firstcarquote was recalled two hours before its official launch and then was launched with reduced functionality after Facebook denied authorization, stating that the initiative breaches Facebook’s platform policy.

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Airbnb challenges New York law regulating short-term rentals

By Daisy Joo – Edited by Nehaa Chaudhari

Airbnb filed a complaint in the Federal District Court of the Southern District of New York seeking to “enjoin and declare unlawful the enforcement against Airbnb” of the recent law that prohibits  the advertising of short-term rentals on Airbnb and other similar websites.  Airbnb argued that the new law violated its rights to free speech and due process, and that it was inconsistent with Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects online intermediaries that host or republish speech from a range of liabilities.

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Medtronic v. Bosch post-Cuozzo: PTAB continues to have the final say on inter partes review

By Nehaa Chaudhari – Edited by Grace Truong

The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (“the Federal Circuit”) reaffirmed its earlier order, dismissing Medtronic’s appeal against a decision of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”). The PTAB had dismissed Medtronic’s petition for inter partes review of Bosch’s patents, since Medtronic had failed to disclose all real parties in interest, as required by 35 U.S.C. §312(a)(2).

 

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California DMV Discuss Rules on Autonomous Vehicles

DOJ Release Guidelines on CFAA Prosecutions

Illinois Supreme Court Rule in Favor of State Provisions Requiring Disclosure of Online Identities of Sex Offenders

Research Shows Concerns for Crucial Infrastructure Information Leaks

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By Amy Zhang

Icon-newsSamsung Sues Dyson for Damages to Its Reputation

Last August, the well-known vacuum maker Dyson sued Samsung for patent infringement in the United Kingdom, where Dyson is based. Dyson alleged that Samsung’s MotionSync vacuums used technology that violated patents Dyson holds for technology in its MotoSync vacuums. According to Ars Technica, Dyson dropped the suit for unknown reasons, citing “loopholes in the patent system.”

Now, Samsung has filed a 10 billion won (about $9.43 million) lawsuit in South Korea, claiming damages from Dyson for hurting Samsung’s public image by portraying Samsung as a “repeat patent violator or copycat.” Samsung has previously engaged in legal battles with Apple over patent infringement.

“Samsung has the right to assess the damage the lawsuit has caused. Samsung is going to take a hard-line stance against patent trolls that use litigations as a marketing tool,” said a Samsung executive to The Korean Times via telephone last Sunday.

Maker of Candy Crush Saga Files for an IPO

King Digital Entertainment, maker of the smash hit mobile game Candy Crush Saga, filed papers for an initial public offering (“IPO”) with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission this week on Tuesday. The company has set $500 million as the fundraising goal for its IPO. The company would become the biggest publicly held company in the casual gaming industry.

Candy Crush Saga has been a huge source of profit for King Digital Entertainment. The game debuted in summer 2012. Since then, the company’s profits jumped from $7.8 million in 2012 to $567.6 million in 2013. Candy Crush has an average of 93 million users per day and is the second most popular game in Apple’s App Store.

Venture Beat has pointed out one potential problem with the filing. King’s revenues declined from $621 million in the third quarter of last year to $602 million in the fourth quarter. Moreover, in its IPO filing, King acknowledges that “a small number of games currently generate a substantial majority of our revenue,” but emphasizes that it is attempting to diversify its line up of games beyond Candy Crush.

AT&T Releases First Transparency Report

On Tuesday, AT&T published its first transparency report, revealing that it received nearly 302,000 data requests in 2013 relating to criminal and civil cases. The requests included more than 248,000 subpoenas, close to 37,000 court orders, and more than 16,000 search warrants. AT&T says it has rejected the requests in 3,756 cases and only provided partial data in 13,707 cases.

In addition, AT&T was also asked nearly 38,000 times last year to disclose information relating to the real-time and historic locations of its customers.

In its report, AT&T revealed that it received between 2,000 and 2,999 National Security Letters in 2013 (the Department of Justice limits how specific AT&T can be in this context). In the first half of 2013, AT&T received between 0 to 999 requests under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) for user data that impacted between 35,000 and 35,999 customer accounts.

AT&T’s report comes after Verizon’s release of a transparency report in January, both reports possibly responding to shareholder proposals filed by the ACLU and other investors. Verizon received about 320,000 data requests, including 164,000 subpoena requests, and between 1000 to 1999 National Security Letters.

Posted On Feb - 18 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Albert Chen – Edited by Andrew Spore

S.B. 962, 2014 Leg., Reg. Sess. (Cal. 2014)
Bill

On February 6, 2014, California State Senator Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) introduced Senate Bill 962. The bill would mandate that all smartphones sold in California must be equipped with a “kill switch,” allowing consumers to disable a lost or stolen phone. S.B. 962 at 1. The bill aims to deter phone thefts, which account for one in three robberies in the United States. Id. at 2. California State Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner said she will carry the bill, if it clears the Senate, reports SFGate.

According to Mashable, if the bill passes, California would lead the nation in requiring anti-theft technology for smart phones. Ars Technica speculates that, due to California’s size, this may lead to a de facto standard nationwide.

(more…)

Posted On Feb - 18 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Mengyi Wang – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

Photo By: C DCC BY 2.0

Last weekend, Los Angeles residents stood in line to taste free coffee at a new coffee shop in town: “Dumb Starbucks.” The stunt was later discovered to have been orchestrated by Comedy Central comedian Nathan Fielder, Quartz reports. Although short-lived—the shop was shut down by the Los Angeles Health Department for operating without a health permit— Dumb Starbucks drew considerable attention and raised an array of legal issues.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Dumb Starbucks opened on Friday, February 7. The shop was identical to a real Starbucks shop except that the word “dumb” affixed to everything in sight. The shop offered, for free, items including “Dumb Vanilla Blonde Roast,” “Dumb Chai Tea Latte,” and “Dumb Caramel Macchiato” in sizes “Dumb Venti,” “Dumb Grande,” and “Dumb Tall.” The CDs sitting on a shelf by the cash register included “Dumb Jazz Standards,” “Dumb Norah Jones Duets”, and “A Dumb Taste of Cuba.” The “dumb” theme also extended to its logo, with “dumb” inserted into the outer ring of the Starbucks logo, reports Time. (more…)

Posted On Feb - 15 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Aditya Gupta – Edited by Kathleen McGuinness

Professors’ Letter In Support of Patent Reform Legislation (Nov. 25, 2013), letter hosted by PatentlyO.com
Statement from the Higher Education Community on H.R. 3309, The Innovation Act (Nov. 8, 2013), statement hosted by
Statement from the Higher Education Community on Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to H.R. 3309 (Nov. 19, 2013), statement hosted by aamc.org

Photo By: Kate Ter HaarCC BY 2.0

The Innovation Act, a legislation that received bipartisan support in the House Judiciary Committee and more recently the House of Representatives, has also received support from a group of sixty professors teaching intellectual property law at universities across the United States. The professors have addressed a letter to Congress expressing strong support for the patent reform legislation, citing the “abusive practices” adopted by patent trolls and the negative impact of such practices on small companies and large manufacturers. In contrast, a group of six major education organizations have issued two statements, dated November 8 and 19, 2013 raising concerns over the draft of the Innovation Act and claiming that, in its current form, the provisions of the Act raise a “specter of unintended problems.”

PatentlyO reports the letter by the law professors stating that the professors’ case has merit but contains certain broad – brush statements and is overtly in favor of large corporate entities. Timothy Lee of The Washington Post is surprised by the stance taken by the university organizations, though he suggests that the unintended effects of the legislation may be beneficial, since they could rein in aggressive patent licensing efforts by universities. (more…)

Posted On Dec - 18 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Automattic Inc. & Hotham v. Steiner
Automattic Inc. & Retraction Watch, LLC v. Chatwal
By Travis West – Edited by Natalie Kim

Complaint, Automattic Inc. & Oliver Hotham v. Nick Steiner (N.D. Cal. filed Nov. 21, 2013)
Complaint, Automattic Inc. & Retraction Watch, LLC v. Narendra Chatwal (N.D. Cal. filed Nov. 21, 2013)
Hotham Complaint, Retraction Watch Complaint hosted by Automattic

Hacked By Over-XAutomattic, the owner of WordPress.com and a major developer of the WordPress software, has sued two parties for using the notice-and-takedown provision of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”) to stifle criticism. Automattic alleges that the two parties abused the provision and are seeking damages under 17 U.S.C. § 512(f) for misrepresentation. Automattic is one of the largest blog hosting companies, and its decision to go after parties that use fraudulent copyright takedown notices could mark a shift in how content hosts handle DMCA takedown requests.

Automattic explains why it chose to sue over these two incidents. Ars Technica provides additional coverage of the lawsuit, including some problems Automattic would face in collecting from the defendants if it succeeded. Cory Doctorow on BoingBoing, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (“EFF”), and TechCrunch praise Automattic for taking a stand against the use of the DMCA to censor critics. (more…)

Posted On Dec - 6 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST
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