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Newegg Wins Patent Troll Case After Court Delays

By Kasey Wang – Edited by Yunnan Jiang and Travis West

The District Court for the Eastern District of Texas recently issued a final judgement for online retailer Newegg, twenty months after trial, vacating a $2.3 million jury award for TQP. TQP, a patent assertion entity commonly known as a “patent troll,” collected $45 million in settlements for the patent in question before Newegg’s trial.

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The Evolution of Internet Service Providers from Partners to Adversaries: Tracking Shifts in Interconnection Goals and Strategies in the Internet’s Fifth Generation

By Robert Frieden – Edited by Marcela Viviana Ruiz Martinez, Olga Slobodyanyuk and Yaping Zhang

In respone to increasing attempts by Internet Service Providers to target customers who trigger higher costs for rate increases, the FCC and other regulatory agencies worldwide have stepped in to prevent market failure and anticompetitive practices. This paper will examine new models for the carriage of Internet traffic that have arisen in the wake of these changes.

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The Global Corporate Citizen:  Responding to International Law Enforcement Requests for Online User Data 

By Kate Westmoreland – Edited by Yunnan Jiang

This paper analyses the law controlling when U.S.-based providers can provide online user data to foreign governments. The focus is on U.S. law because U.S. dominance of internet providers means that U.S. laws affect a large number of global users. The first half of this paper outlines the legal framework governing these requests. The second half highlights the gaps in the law and how individual companies’ policies fill these gaps.

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Symposium Introduction: Legal Issues in Computer and Internet Law and the Quagmire of Appropriate Legal Frameworks in the Modern Era

By Deborah Beth Medows – Edited by Yaping Zhang

Jurists must widely examine the pervasive challenges among the advents in Internet and computer technology in order to ensure that legal systems protect individuals while  encouraging innovation.  It is precisely due to the legal and societal quagmires that 3D printing and net neutrality pose that ideally position them as springboards from which to delve into broader discussions on technology law.

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A Victory for Compatibility: the Ninth Circuit Gives Teeth to RAND Terms

By Stacy Ruegilin – Edited by Ken Winterbottom

Microsoft won a victory in the Ninth Circuit last Thursday after the court found that Motorola, a former Google subsidiary, had breached its obligation to offer licenses for standards-essential technologies at reasonable and non-discriminatory rates. The court affirmed a $14.52 million jury verdict against Motorola for the breach.

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Ass’n for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc.
By Alex Shank – Edited by David LeRay

Ass’n for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., No. 12-398 (U.S. Apr. 15, 2013)
Transcript of Oral Argument

Photo By: brett jordanCC BY 2.0

On Monday, April 15, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments to determine the validity of a patent encompassing the use of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Mutations in these genes correlate strongly with the development of breast and ovarian cancers. As the patent owner, Myriad Genetics, Inc. (“Myriad”) possesses and exercises the exclusive right to sell diagnostic testing kits based on these genes.

The ACLU first challenged the constitutionality of the Myriad patent in the District Court of the Southern District of New York (“SDNY”), claiming that the patent violated the First Amendment. The SDNY invalidated the patent on other grounds, holding that the genes were “products of nature” and thus not patentable subject matter. On appeal, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (“CAFC”) affirmed that “comparing” gene sequences was unpatentable as an “abstract mental step” but reversed the SDNY by holding that Myriad’s “screening” claims were patentable. After deciding Mayo Collaborative Servs. v. Prometheus Labs., Inc., the Supreme Court vacated the CAFC’s earlier decision and remanded the case to be decided in light of Mayo. The CAFC reaffirmed that isolated genes were patentable as “markedly different” from genes in the human body and reaffirmed its earlier position on the various method patents. The ACLU appealed to the Supreme Court.

SCOTUSblog comments on the Supreme Court’s skepticism regarding the validity of the Myriad patents. The New York Times offers a summary of the oral argument and background on the case. Nature newsblog and Patently-O predict how the Supreme Court may narrow the scope of its holding to a particular class of genetic material. JOLT Digest previously commented on the implications of a ban on gene patents. (more…)

Posted On Apr - 29 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Charlie Stiernberg

Digital Public Library of America Goes Live, Sans Fanfare

The Digital Public Library of America (“DPLA”) website went live late last week; however, the celebration was postponed in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing, reports the Harvard Crimson. After more than two years of planning, the DPLA became the first national digital library in the world—with about two million books, pictures, manuscripts, and other materials. The staff is working to overcome copyright obstacles to add more works. A ceremony was to take place on April 18 and 19 at the Boston Public Library, the first public library in the country. But given its proximity to the site of the bombings, organizers decided to reschedule the event for the fall.

ITC Rules Apple iPhone did not Violate Motorola Patents

The International Trade Commission (“ITC”) terminated its investigation into Apple’s alleged infringement of Motorola U.S. Patent No. 6,246,862 (“the ‘862 patent”), “Sensor controlled user interface for portable communication device,” finding no violation of section 337, reports Ars Technica. The ‘862 patent was the last patent remaining of the six included in the original complaint filed by Motorola in 2010. In a notice issued April 22, the ITC found that the ‘862 patent is obvious in view of U.S. Patent Nos. 6,052,464 and 5,894,298. The case is one piece of a larger patent battle between Apple and Motorola, being waged in courts worldwide.

Parties Race to Register “Boston Strong” Trademark with USPTO

Less than a week after the Boston Marathon bombing, two Massachusetts parties have applied to trademark the phrase “Boston Strong” with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”), reports the Huffington Post. The first application, filed by Born Into It, Inc., is a standard character mark for “clothing and accessories.” The second application, filed by an individual, is also a standard character mark for “[i]mprinting messages on T-shirts.” The hashtag #BostonStrong has garnered a strong following on Twitter over the last week. The Huffington Post notes that similar applications following the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks were denied by the USPTO.

Posted On Apr - 29 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Ron Gonski

Flash DigestHouse Passes CISPA

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, reports Ars Technica. The proposed bill aims to facilitate the sharing of data between Internet companies and the government for cybersecurity purposes. The bill faces an uphill battle in the Senate, as a previous version of the bill died there last year, notes NBC News. President Obama has threatened to veto the bill, under fears that the bill does not do enough for user privacy, according to the New York Times.


Federal Circuit Renews K-Tech Communications Lawsuit Against DirecTV

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit renewed a lawsuit filed by K-Tech Communications against DirecTV for alleged patent infringement, Bloomberg reports. The court ruled that a complaint for patent infringement does not have to identify the infringing device to satisfy the requirements of Form 18 (the sample complaint for patent infringement in the Appendix of Forms to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure). K-Tech Telecommunications Inc. v. Time Warner Cable Inc., No. 12-1425, slip op. at 17 (Fed. Cir. Apr. 18, 2013). Interestingly, the court also stated that, should there be a conflict between Form 18 and the plausibility standard for pleading requirements set forth in Iqbal and Twombly, Form 18 would control. Id. at 11.

Government Squashes Dozens of Patents a Year for National Security Reasons

Government “secrecy orders” have prevented more than 5,000 inventions from being patented, reports Wired. If the Department of Defense believes that an invention could be a national security threat, it can issue a secrecy order to prevent the inventor from discussing the technology with anyone. Patent applicants can appeal a secrecy order, but that process can often take years. The applicable law is based on a vague standard of “detrimental to national security,” according to Wired.

Posted On Apr - 22 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Capitol Records, LLC v. ReDigi Inc.
By Charlie Stiernberg – Edited by Andrew Crocker

Capitol Records, LLC v. ReDigi Inc., No. 12 Civ. 95 (RJS) (S.D.N.Y. Mar. 30, 2013)
Slip Opinion

Internet startup ReDigi—“the world’s first and only online marketplace for digital used music”—recently suffered a setback in the rollout of its digital music resale platform. Capitol Records, LLC v. ReDigi Inc., No. 12 Civ. 95 (RJS), slip op. at 1 (S.D.N.Y. Mar. 30, 2013). Judge Sullivan for the District Court for the Southern District of New York granted plaintiff Capitol Records’ motion for partial summary judgment on its claims for defendant ReDigi’s direct, contributory, and vicarious infringement of its exclusive distribution and reproduction rights under the 1976 Copyright Act. The court held, in a case of first impression, that the first sale doctrine,17 U.S.C. § 109(a), does not permit the resale of a digital music file, and that uploading to and downloading from the cloud “incident to a sale” falls outside the scope of the fair use defense, 17 U.S.C. § 107.

The New York Times provides a summary of the case and places it in the context of a broader debate over digital secondary markets, including books and movies. The Electronic Frontier Foundation expresses frustration over the court’s decision not to “bring the first sale doctrine into the 21st century.” Billboard notes that unlike iTunes sales, record labels do not get any proceeds from ReDigi sales of “perfect digital copies of ‘pre-owned’ music.” (more…)

Posted On Apr - 19 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Timelines, Inc. v. Facebook, Inc.
By Ashish Bakshi – Edited by Dorothy Du

Timelines, Inc. v. Facebook, Inc., No. 11-cv-6867 (N.D. Ill. Apr. 1, 2013)
Memorandum Opinion and Order (hosted by Justia.com)

Photo By: Robert ScobleCC BY 2.0

Facebook, Inc. (“Facebook”) lost its bid for a quick end to a trademark infringement suit filed by Timelines, Inc. (“Timelines”) over the social networking giant’s use of the term “timeline.” The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois denied Facebook’s motion for summary judgment on each of Timelines’ claims and its own counterclaims. The court held that Facebook failed to show as a matter of law that Timelines’ trademark for “timeline” was generic or merely descriptive or , if the trademark were valid, that Facebook’s use of the term constituted fair use. A jury trial will commence on April 22.

PCWorld and Bloomberg provide overviews of the case. (more…)

Posted On Apr - 16 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST
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