A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news
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By Jaehwan Park – Edited by Kayla Haran

Bipartisan Lawmakers Introduce Bill Encouraging U.S. Government Agencies to Use the Cloud as a Secure Alternative to Legacy Systems

Snapchat Accused of Violating Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative Announces New Policy Group to Promote Global Digital Trade

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Second Circuit Prohibits Extraterritorial Application of Stored Communication Act’s Warrant Provision

The Second Circuit reversed a U.S. Magistrate Judge’s warrant ordering Microsoft to produce customer content stored in Ireland. The Second Circuit held that the warrant provisions in § 2703 of the Stored Communications Act, 18 USC §§2701-2712 (1986) (“SCA”), cannot be used to compel a service provider to disclose user e-mail content stored exclusively on a foreign server.

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U.S. District Court Denied TC Heartland’s Writ of Mandamus to Transfer Patent Infringement Suit

 

In April 2016, the Federal Circuit denied TC Heartland LLC’s writ of mandamus. Hartland requested the court order the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware to dismiss or transfer the patent infringement suit initiated by Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC. In rejecting Hartland’s request, the court explained that a writ of mandamus is an “extraordinary remedy appropriate only in exceptional circumstances” and Hartland did not meet this bar.

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Congresswoman Speier’s Revenge Pornography Bill: Crossing the First Amendment Line?

On July 14, 2016, Congresswoman Speier proposed the Intimate Privacy Protection Act, a bill designed to make revenge pornography a federal crime punishable with up to five years in prison. Although the current version is narrower in scope than previous iterations, there are still some concerns that this bill violates the First Amendment’s right to free speech.

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Following an unfavorable verdict from a second jury and the Court’s denial of the first motion for judgment as a matter of law (“JMOL”), Oracle America, Inc. (“Oracle”) filed a renewed motion for JMOL pursuant to FRCP Rule 50(b). Oracle’s second motion, filed July 6, 2016, claimed that “no reasonable jury” could find that Google’s “verbatim [and] entirely commercial” copying of Oracle’s code, in order to compete with Oracle, was fair use.[1] The motion will be heard on August 18, 2016.

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By Sheri Pan – Edited by Insue Kim

Press release by Monika Bickert, Head of Global Policy Management, Facebook Announcement (Mar. 5, 2014)
Press release

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Last Wednesday, Facebook issued a press release announcing policy changes aimed at reducing the sale of guns over its social media platforms Facebook and Instagram. Created after consulting with gun-control organizations and New York’s Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, the measures respond to concerns over the growing number of guns sold online.

The New York Times, Ars Technica, and CNN reported the story. The Verge describes how Instagram users find guns using the photo-sharing application. The National Rifle Association (“NRA”) and Moms Demand Action responded to the announcement. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 15 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

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Written By: Hyeongsu Park

Edited By: Kendra Albert

The recent boom in antibody products in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries created the needs for a clear standard for antibody patents. The market for therapeutic antibodies is projected to reach hundreds of billion dollars within the next several years, and, as such, a huge amount of money will be at stake in future patent infringement cases regarding therapeutic antibodies. However, currently there is an apparent tension between the USPTO guideline with which antibody patents are granted and the case law with which the validity of existing antibody patents is determined. The antibody “exception” of the USPTO written description guideline says that a claim for an isolated antibody binding to an antigen satisfies the written description requirement even when the specification only describes the antigen and does not have working or detailed prophetic examples of antibodies that bind to the antigen. United States Patent and Trademark Office, Revised Interim Written Description Guidelines Training Materials (1999) at 59–60 [hereinafter Training Materials]; United States Patent and Trademark Office, Written Description Training Materials, Revision 1 (March 25, 2008) at 45–46 [hereinafter Revised Training Materials]. In Centocor v. Abbott, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (“Federal Circuit”) held that a patentee cannot claim an antibody unless the specification describes it, even if he/she fully characterizes the antigen, and the court vacated a $1.67 billion jury verdict, the largest patent infringement award in U.S. history. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 13 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Mark Verstraete – Edited by Andrew Spore

Garcia v. Google, Inc.,  No. 12-57302 (9th Cir. Feb. 26, 2014)
Slip opinion

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On February 26, 2014, the Ninth Circuit reversed a district court decision denying Cindy Lee Garcia’s request for a preliminary injunction forcing YouTube to remove the anti-Islamic film “Innocence of Muslims.” Garcia, slip op. at 19. Writing for the majority, Chief Judge Alex Kozinski found that Garcia was entitled to a preliminary injunction because she had shown a likelihood of success on her copyright claim and that irreparable harm would likely result absent injunctive relief.

Techdirt offers a lengthy criticism of the ruling. Electronic Frontier Foundation worries that the opinion’s specious reasoning could set unfavorable copyright precedent. UCLA School of Law Professor Eugene Volokh, writing for the Washington Post, notes that the injunction applies only versions of the film containing Garcia’s performance. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 12 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Insue Kim – Edited by Elise Young

Elcommerce.com, Inc. v. SAP AG, No. 2011-1369 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 24, 2014)
Slip opinion

In re Barnes & Noble, Inc., No. 13-162 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 27, 2014)
Slip opinion

In re Apple Inc., No. 13-156 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 27, 2014)
Slip opinion

Federal CircuitThe United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit upheld the transfer of venue of Elcommerce, Inc. v. SAP AG, from the Eastern District of Texas to the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. In response to Elcommerce’s claim that the declaratory counterclaims could not be transferred to the Pennsylvania court without voluntary or personal jurisdiction, the court emphasized that there is “‘no requirement under § 1404(a) that a transferee court have jurisdiction over the plaintiff . . . [as long as] the transferee court ha[s] jurisdiction over the defendants in the transferred complaint.’” Elcommerce.com, slip op. at 10 (quoting In re Genentech, 566 F.3d 1338, 1346 (Fed. Cir. 2009)). As plaintiff, Elcommerce was subject to the declaratory counterclaims filed by SAP in Texas, and “jurisdiction was preserved when the entire action was transferred to Pennsylvania . . . .” Id. at 9.

The case was one of many “patent troll” cases regularly filed in the District Court of the Eastern District of Texas. Because of the treatment plaintiffs receive in the Eastern District of Texas, many defendants attempt to transfer their cases to another district. This has made procedural decisions from the Federal Circuit increasingly significant. ArsTechnica discusses why the Eastern District of Texas is such a popular venue for patent trolls. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 11 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Gizem Orbey – Edited by David Curtis

DSC_4000“Internet access feels like clean water and energy, but it is treated like a luxury, and the whole country is forced towards a giant buffet,” explained Susan Crawford, the John A. Reilly Visiting Professor in Intellectual Property at Harvard Law School, at a JOLT talk on March 4, 2014.

Professor Crawford, who is also a Co-Director of the Berkman Center and a former White House Special Assistant, spoke about the significance of Comcast’s recent bid to buy Time Warner Cable (“Time Warner”) for $45 billion. The proposed merger would consolidate a third of the nation’s cable marketplace into Comcast’s hands. Lawmakers, consumer advocates, and academics worry that the merger would create monopoly conditions, giving Comcast enormous bargaining power with edge providers and electronic, mobile and broadcast device companies. Comcast and Time Warner currently do not complete directly. Through the proposed merger, Comcast seeks access to New York City, Texas, and other markets currently dominated by Time Warner. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 11 - 2014 1 Comment READ FULL POST
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