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Google Refuses to Expand the Right to be Forgotten

By Leonidas Angelakos – Edited by Henry Thomas

Last Thursday, Google announced its refusal to comply with a June 2015 right-t0-be-forgotten order issued by a French regulatory agency. The tech giant called the order, which demanded that it remove qualifying links from all Google search results, not just those on its European domains,  “a troubling development that risks serious chilling effects on the web.”

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German Commission Orders Facebook to Allow Fake Names

By Annie Woodworth – Edited by Ariane Moss

Last Tuesday, the Hamburg Data Protection Authority, a German regulatory body, ordered Facebook to lift its policy prohibiting users from choosing pseudonyms. Although there was some dispute over whether the order applied to Facebook, the social media giant agreed to change the policy and issued an apology.

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Nintendo Wins Summary Judgment Based on Doctrine of Prosecution History Estoppel

By Yaping Zhang – Edited by Stacy Ruegilin

On July 17, 2015, the Northern District Court of California granted a summary judgment motion in Nintendo’s favor in a patent suit, construing disputed term in accordance with Nintendo’s interpretation and finding that the patent had not been infringed. The court based its decision on prosecution history estoppel, highlighting differences between the processes of obtaining and enforcing a patent.

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District Court Holds that Internet-Based Television Provider, FilmOn X is Entitled to a Compulsory License

By Anne Woodworth – Edited by Henry Thomas

The U.S. District court for the Central District of California ruled that an online streaming service that rebroadcasted network television fit the definition of a cable company, and was entitled to compulsory licensing under § 111 of the Copyright Act.  The order relied on the Supreme Court’s Aereo decision, which held that internet streaming was fundamentally the same as cable. The ruling conflicts with a Second Circuit case decided on similar facts, and is immediately appealable.

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Data Breach Victims, Rejoice: Seventh Circuit Finds that Threat of Injury is Sufficient for Article III Standing in Data Breach Class Actions

By Brittany Doyle – Edited by Ariane Moss

Last Monday, the Seventh Circuit Courto of Appeals ruled that victims of a data breach had standing to pursue a class action even when they had not suffered direct financial harm as a result of the breach or when they had already been compensated for financial harm resulting from the breach. The opinion reversed a contrary district court decision, which the Seventh Circuit said had incorrectly read the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Clapper v. Amnesty International USA.

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By Gea Kang – Edited by Emma Winer

S.B. 2005, 108th Gen. Assemb., 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill
H.B. 1974, 108th Gen. Assemb., 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill

S.B. 2140, 108th Gen. Assemb., 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill
H.B. 2242, 108th Gen. Assemb. 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill

S.B. 2428, 108th Gen. Assemb., 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill
H.B. 2364, 108th Gen. Assemb., 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill

S.B. 2562, 108th Gen. Assemb., 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill
H.B. 2482, 108th Gen. Assemb. 2d. Sess. (Tenn. 2014) Bill

Photo By: AJ BatacCC BY 2.0

Four bills recently introduced in the Tennessee legislature are in the spotlight for their potential impact on the evolving broadband network landscape. The bills have bipartisan sponsorship and collectively aim to roll back restrictions on the ability of municipal governments to establish broadband networks of their own.

Two of the bills focus on specific localities. S.B. 2005 and H.B. 1974 would expand the municipal electric system’s provision of broadband service in Clarksville, Tennessee’s fifth largest city, while S.B. 2140 and H.B. 2242 would allow Trousdale County  to contract with a rural electric cooperative to provide broadband services.  The other two bills address statewide policy. S.B. 2428 and H.B. 2364 revise the definition of “telecommunications”  in Tenn. Code. Ann. § 65-25-202 to enable electric cooperatives that own dark fiber networks to reach customers who are not currently served by rural telephone cooperatives. S.B. 2428 at 1.  S.B. 2562 and H.B.2482 would facilitate the expansion of municipal utilities’ broadband services in connection with economic development, education, and health care projects. S.B. 2562 at 1. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 17 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Shuangjun Wang

Icon-newsWorld Wide Web inventor seeks to pass a Magna Carta for the Internet

Twenty-five years ago, British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. Today, he’s calling for a new – or very old, depending on how you look at it – invention to complement his first. In an interview with the BBC, Berners-Lee advocated for a global Constitution and Bill of Rights to protect Internet users everywhere from what he perceives to be a declining level of user freedom and independence on the Internet, especially in light of the privacy issues raised by governments’ “mining” of personal data.

Having such a charter will force governments to recognize that Internet user privacy and data protection are “so important, so much part of our lives, that [they] become[] on a level with human rights,” reports The Sydney Morning Herald, quoting Berners-Lee. The British computer scientist also proposes that lawmakers create a codified system of rights to ensure “no surveillance without suspicion, that our digital communication and behavior are treated with the same respect and legal due process that we expect for our offline communication and behavior,” reports Cambridge News. To make his Magna Carta a reality, Berners-Lee has established Web We Want, a campaign focused on initiating national dialogues about Internet usage and privacy rights and on drafting legislation for an “Internet Users’ Bill of Rights.”

Facebook v. Power Ventures celebrates its six-year anniversary in the Ninth Circuit

In 2013, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California ordered Power Ventures, a now bankrupt social network aggregation tool, to pay Facebook $3 million after that court found that Power Ventures had violated 18 U.S.C. § 1030 (2008) (“Computer Fraud and Abuse Act” or “CFAA”), 15 U.S.C. ch. 103 (2003) (“CAN-SPAM Act“), and 13 Cal. Penal § 502 (2001) for accessing Facebook data after Facebook had blocked Power Ventures’ IP addresses. Facebook, Inc. v. Power Ventures, Inc., No. 8-cv-5780 (N.D. Cal. Sept. 25, 2013) hosted by Leagle.

Power Ventures has appealed the ruling in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (“EFF”) has filed another amicus brief in order to highlight the “dangers” of upholding Facebook’s claims. Circumventing IP-address blocks typically falls within the scope of “hacking” under the CFAA. According to the EFF, however, because Power Ventures was only a social network aggregating tool, Facebook users were the ones accessing their own Facebook data through Power Ventures’ servers. Criminalizing such aggregators would stunt technological innovation and market competition. In addition, Congress targeted large-scale spammers with CAN-SPAM Act. According to the EFF, if the Ninth Circuit affirms the district court’s decision, that precedent will bring all Facebook users who advertise with Facebook Events under the Act’s scope of liability.

Google’s new encryption sends data through China’s Great Firewall

Tech companies such as Google and Facebook have advertised user privacy as their number one priority for some time, but, as reported by The New York Times, privacy activists and security specialists question the companies’ actual efforts at privacy protection.

Google has taken a step in the right direction by combating government surveillance and censorship of search engines in China. According to SiliconValley.com, Google began working late last year to automatically encrypt searches as part of the global expansion of its privacy technology plan. Google’s automatic encryption – which will take effect in the coming weeks – will prevent the Chinese government from screening searches and eliminating potentially politically controversial hits.

Although Google’s market share in China is only an estimated 10%, its move to subvert and bypass the “Great Firewall of China“ is an initiative that Google hopes will catch on and “encourage the industry to adopt stronger security standards,” reports The Register. Automatic encryption of search terms will not only prevent the government from identifying search terms and censoring hits, it will also protect users’ personal information and data from being immediately available to third parties.

Posted On Mar - 16 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Sheri Pan – Edited by Insue Kim

Press release by Monika Bickert, Head of Global Policy Management, Facebook Announcement (Mar. 5, 2014)
Press release

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Last Wednesday, Facebook issued a press release announcing policy changes aimed at reducing the sale of guns over its social media platforms Facebook and Instagram. Created after consulting with gun-control organizations and New York’s Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, the measures respond to concerns over the growing number of guns sold online.

The New York Times, Ars Technica, and CNN reported the story. The Verge describes how Instagram users find guns using the photo-sharing application. The National Rifle Association (“NRA”) and Moms Demand Action responded to the announcement. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 15 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

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Written By: Hyeongsu Park

Edited By: Kendra Albert

The recent boom in antibody products in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries created the needs for a clear standard for antibody patents. The market for therapeutic antibodies is projected to reach hundreds of billion dollars within the next several years, and, as such, a huge amount of money will be at stake in future patent infringement cases regarding therapeutic antibodies. However, currently there is an apparent tension between the USPTO guideline with which antibody patents are granted and the case law with which the validity of existing antibody patents is determined. The antibody “exception” of the USPTO written description guideline says that a claim for an isolated antibody binding to an antigen satisfies the written description requirement even when the specification only describes the antigen and does not have working or detailed prophetic examples of antibodies that bind to the antigen. United States Patent and Trademark Office, Revised Interim Written Description Guidelines Training Materials (1999) at 59–60 [hereinafter Training Materials]; United States Patent and Trademark Office, Written Description Training Materials, Revision 1 (March 25, 2008) at 45–46 [hereinafter Revised Training Materials]. In Centocor v. Abbott, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (“Federal Circuit”) held that a patentee cannot claim an antibody unless the specification describes it, even if he/she fully characterizes the antigen, and the court vacated a $1.67 billion jury verdict, the largest patent infringement award in U.S. history. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 13 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Mark Verstraete – Edited by Andrew Spore

Garcia v. Google, Inc.,  No. 12-57302 (9th Cir. Feb. 26, 2014)
Slip opinion

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On February 26, 2014, the Ninth Circuit reversed a district court decision denying Cindy Lee Garcia’s request for a preliminary injunction forcing YouTube to remove the anti-Islamic film “Innocence of Muslims.” Garcia, slip op. at 19. Writing for the majority, Chief Judge Alex Kozinski found that Garcia was entitled to a preliminary injunction because she had shown a likelihood of success on her copyright claim and that irreparable harm would likely result absent injunctive relief.

Techdirt offers a lengthy criticism of the ruling. Electronic Frontier Foundation worries that the opinion’s specious reasoning could set unfavorable copyright precedent. UCLA School of Law Professor Eugene Volokh, writing for the Washington Post, notes that the injunction applies only versions of the film containing Garcia’s performance. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 12 - 2014 Comments Off READ FULL POST
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