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In Response to Ruling by European Court of Justice, Netherlands Bans Unauthorized Downloading of Copyrighted Material
By Andrew Spore – Edited by Travis West

ACI Adam BV v. Stichting de Thuiskopie

In response to an order issued by the European Court of Justice (“ECJ”), the Netherlands has banned the unauthorized downloading of copyrighted material. The Dutch government previously had allowed such downloading for personal use. The ECJ held that, because the law “makes no distinction between private copies made from lawful sources and those made from counterfeited or pirated sources,” it could not be tolerated.

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Flash Digest: News In Brief
By Olga Slobodyanyuk

Amici urge the Ninth Circuit to reconsider its ruling in the “Innocence of Muslims” case

Record companies sue Pandora for royalties on songs made before 1972

Alleged Heartbleed hacker arrested

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Specific Facts Supporting Indirect Infringement Required for Software Supplier to Obtain Declaratory Judgment Against Patentee Suing End Users
By Geng Chen – Edited by Ashish Bakshi

Microsoft Corp. v. DataTern, Inc., No. 13-1184 (Fed. Cir. Apr. 4, 2014)

The Federal Circuit held that Microsoft and SAP had standing to bring invalidity and noninfringement declaratory judgment actions against DataTern, based on DataTern’s previous lawsuits against those companies’ software customers for direct patent infringement, but only to the extent that those direct infringement claims also established a controversy on issues of contributory and induced infringement.

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DOJ Indicts Nine for Zeus Malware Theft From Online Bank Accounts
By Emma Winer – Edited by Sheri Pan

United States v. Penchukov

Last week, the Department of Justice released a previously sealed indictment against alleged conspirators in an international scheme that stole millions of dollars from online bank accounts. The conspirators allegedly infected thousands of computers with “Zeus” malware, which captured passwords, bank account numbers, and other online banking information. Two of the defendants were arraigned in Nebraska after being extradited from the United Kingdom.

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European Court of Justice Invalidates Data Retention Directive
By Paul Klein – Edited by Alex Shank

In a preliminary ruling requested by courts in Ireland and Austria, the European Court of Justice found that Directive 2006/24/EC was invalid. The Grand Chamber recognized the legitimacy of retaining telecommunications data as a means to combat serious crime and terrorism, but it ultimately held that the far-reaching scope of the Directive disproportionately affected individual privacy under the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

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By Simon Heimowitz – Edited by Kathleen McGuinness

Photo By: Sean MacEnteeCC BY 2.0

On August 3, the Obama administration issued a veto on an International Trade Commission (“ITC”) exclusion order that had effectively banned the importation of some older models of the iPhone and iPad. Letter from Michael B. G. Froman, U.S. Trade Representative, to Irving A. Williamson, Chairman, ITC (Aug. 3, 2013). The ITC had ordered the ban on older Apple devices — the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPad 3G and iPad 2 3G distributed with cellular service by AT&T — after agreeing with Samsung that Apple had infringed one of Samsung’s standard-essential patents (“SEPs”). The ban would have gone into effect on August 5. Ambassador Froman expressed the administration’s decision to veto the exclusion order as the result of “extensive consultations with the agencies of the Trade Policy Staff Committee and the Trade Policy Review Group, as well as other interested agencies and persons,” after which he “decided to disapprove the USITC’s determination to issue an exclusion order and cease and desist order in this investigation.” Letter at 3. As reported by Forbes.com, Froman noted the administration’s decision was made after taking into account the “effect on competitive conditions in the U.S. economy and the effect on U.S. consumers.” Id.

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Posted On Sep - 14 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Elise Young

Flash DigestApple Prevails on Appeal, Re-Opening Door on Motorola Infringement Case

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit held that Apple could proceed in its patent infringement case against Google-owned Motorola Mobility for two touch-screen patents.  Apple Inc. v. Int’l Trade Comm., No. 12-1338 at 2 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 7, 2013). The court reversed in part the International Trade Commission’s findings that the patents at issue were anticipated and obvious. Id. If Apple prevails in its case, some Motorola devices could be banned from sale in the U.S. CNET provides an overview of the case while FOSS Patents discusses the technology and patents in more detail.

Bitcoin Is a Currency that May Be Regulated Under U.S. Law

Magistrate Judge Mazzant recently ruled that Bitcoin is “currency or a form of money.” SEC v. Shavers, No. 13-00416 at 3 (E.D. Tex. Aug. 6, 2013). This determination was significant because it enabled the court to find that investments made by Bitcoin Savings and Trust were “investment contracts” and thus “securities” over which the court had subject matter jurisdiction. Id. at 4. Securities include investment contracts, and an investment contract “is any contract, transaction, or scheme involving (1) an investment of money, (2) in a common enterprise, (3) with the expectation that profits will be derived from the efforts of the promoter or a third party.” Id. at 3. For more general discussion of the case, see Ars Technica.

Federal Circuit’s Judge Plager Argues that Ambiguous Terms Should Be Construed Against the Drafter

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit panel issued three separate opinions in reversing and remanding the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota’s claim construction in a case of patent infringement brought by 3M. 3M Innovative Props. Co. v. Tredegar Corp., No. 12-1241 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 6, 2013). In his concurring opinion, Judge Plager emphasized that the plaintiff’s “sloppy drafting” and frequently conflicting language put the court in the position of “crystal ball” reader, an arduous and nigh-impossible task. Id. at 2 (Plager, J., concurring). Judge Plager went on to advocate that the court adopt the “contract doctrine of contra proferentum” which resolves ambiguous terms against the drafter. Id. at 4.

Posted On Sep - 3 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Photo By: Nancy PelosiCC BY 2.0

Written By: Natalie Kim
Edited By: Alex Shank

Introduction

Amidst heated debate and unprecedented lobbying in Brussels, European Union lawmakers are currently drafting a General Data Protection Regulation (“DPR”) to replace the outdated 1995 Data Protection Directive. The 1995 Directive has been criticized for being technologically outdated and cumbersome to follow. If enacted, the DPR will be among the toughest data protection laws in existence. Regardless of enaction, the DPR signifies a growing rift between EU and U.S. data protection ideals. (more…)

Posted On Aug - 11 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Written by: Suzanne Van Arsdale
Edited by: Michelle Sohn

Introduction

On May 21, 2013, Twitter launched version 1.0 of the Innovator’s Patent Agreement (“IPA”), which formalizes a company’s commitment to non-offensive patenting and leaves some control in the hands of inventors.

This Comment addresses the incentives for and legal implications of adopting the IPA. Part I broadly discusses the content of the IPA and its adoption. Part II reviews the software industry’s concerns and current practices. Part III examines the practical effect of adopting the IPA, its scope, and its binding and defensive nature. Part IV reviews other defensive patenting mechanisms and compares them to the IPA. (more…)

Posted On Aug - 11 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Jonathan Sapp – Edited by Alex Shank

Photo By: Glen Edelson - CC BY 2.0

Photo By: Glen EdelsonCC BY 2.0

In June, a British high court ruled in favor of Volkswagen by enjoining Flavio Garcia from publishing an academic paper that sought to expose weaknesses in Volkswagen’s automobile security systems. In the paper, Garcia revealed secret codes used to activate the ignition systems of several luxury vehicles including those by Audi, Bentley, Lamborghini, and Porsche. The British court’s ruling is the latest in the battle against researchers who expose security systems’ flaws through hacking.

The Guardian provides a thorough analysis of the case. Ars Technica cautions against the “Internet of automobiles” and discusses the latest trend in car hacking: brake and speed tampering. Extreme Tech offers insight into security system hacking and suggests that boats and planes are not immune. (more…)

Posted On Aug - 10 - 2013 Comments Off READ FULL POST
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In Response to Rulin

By Andrew Spore – Edited by Travis West [caption id="attachment_4410" align="alignleft" ...

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Flash Digest: News I

By Olga Slobodyanyuk Amici urge the Ninth Circuit to reconsider its ...

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Specific Facts Suppo

By Geng Chen – Edited by Ashish Bakshi [caption id="attachment_4393" align="alignleft" ...

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DOJ Indicts Nine for

By Emma Winer – Edited by Sheri Pan [caption id="attachment_4373" align="alignleft" ...

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European Court of Ju

By Paul Klein – Edited by Alex Shank [caption id="attachment_4363" align="alignleft" ...