A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news
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By Jaehwan Park – Edited by Kayla Haran

Bipartisan Lawmakers Introduce Bill Encouraging U.S. Government Agencies to Use the Cloud as a Secure Alternative to Legacy Systems

Snapchat Accused of Violating Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative Announces New Policy Group to Promote Global Digital Trade

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Second Circuit Prohibits Extraterritorial Application of Stored Communication Act’s Warrant Provision

The Second Circuit reversed a U.S. Magistrate Judge’s warrant ordering Microsoft to produce customer content stored in Ireland. The Second Circuit held that the warrant provisions in § 2703 of the Stored Communications Act, 18 USC §§2701-2712 (1986) (“SCA”), cannot be used to compel a service provider to disclose user e-mail content stored exclusively on a foreign server.

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U.S. District Court Denied TC Heartland’s Writ of Mandamus to Transfer Patent Infringement Suit

 

In April 2016, the Federal Circuit denied TC Heartland LLC’s writ of mandamus. Hartland requested the court order the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware to dismiss or transfer the patent infringement suit initiated by Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC. In rejecting Hartland’s request, the court explained that a writ of mandamus is an “extraordinary remedy appropriate only in exceptional circumstances” and Hartland did not meet this bar.

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Congresswoman Speier’s Revenge Pornography Bill: Crossing the First Amendment Line?

On July 14, 2016, Congresswoman Speier proposed the Intimate Privacy Protection Act, a bill designed to make revenge pornography a federal crime punishable with up to five years in prison. Although the current version is narrower in scope than previous iterations, there are still some concerns that this bill violates the First Amendment’s right to free speech.

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Following an unfavorable verdict from a second jury and the Court’s denial of the first motion for judgment as a matter of law (“JMOL”), Oracle America, Inc. (“Oracle”) filed a renewed motion for JMOL pursuant to FRCP Rule 50(b). Oracle’s second motion, filed July 6, 2016, claimed that “no reasonable jury” could find that Google’s “verbatim [and] entirely commercial” copying of Oracle’s code, in order to compete with Oracle, was fair use.[1] The motion will be heard on August 18, 2016.

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UnknownBy Allison E. Butler – Edited by Travis West

I. Introduction

On June 19, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its first software patent case in thirty-three years.[1] In the case of Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank,[2] the Court determined the patent eligibility for computer-implemented inventions. While incorporating its previous analysis of Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Lab., Inc.,[3] the Court verified that computer-implemented inventions have protection through patent subject matter eligibility; however, the Court limited this protection by finding that generic computer implementation must further transform an abstract idea to be a patent-eligible invention under 35 U.S.C. § 101. The ruling of Alice is significant as it replaces the once general view held by the courts that §101 was nothing “more than a ‘course [patent] eligibility filter’”[4] with a defined patent eligibility filter derived through a two-part analysis that has placed patentability under Section 101 at “a higher bar.”[5] It has not only been the courts who have taken notice of Alice. The USPTO issued advisories and instructions for its examiners and the public at large as to the handling of patent eligibility for software patents and denied pending patents upon the issuance of Alice.[6]The impact of Alice is broad but it appears to be a decision that was long overdue to address the many issues facing patentability of subject matter eligibility in various arenas where such issues are dominant.

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Posted On Sep - 19 - 2015 Comments Off READ FULL POST

344f15853394cfa361518ee607cd06d1By Ariella Michal Medows – Edited by Kenneth Winterbottom

The United States healthcare industry is undergoing a technological revolution.  As paper medical records are converted to electronic medical records, which are then stored via cloud computing, a myriad of legal questions arise.  Foremost among these are concerns regarding patient privacy and the security of stored personal health information.  It is evident that the storage of electronic medical records in computer clouds is a technological development that is here to stay.  The challenge lies in adapting our healthcare system to the digital age in a legally enforceable, efficient, and cost-effective manner while maintaining quality care and privacy rights for patients.

There are two key components to this healthcare overhaul.  First, transitioning as smoothly as possible to the inevitable nationwide e-health system; and second, determining proper responses to situations where the e-health system does not function correctly.  All systems experience complications at some point, and the e-health system, while more efficacious than paper medical records in the long-term, will present new legal and policy-related dilemmas that a community reliant on paper-based medical charts will initially be unprepared to address.  Ideally, hospitals and healthcare companies should develop backup plans in advance of these hurdles and create prophylactic policies that anticipate technical difficulties.  The U.S. healthcare system should act offensively, rather than defensively, to challenges that will arise as we increase our reliance on technology.  These strategies must be as legally sound as possible, in order to best protect patient privacy and to diminish risks for all parties.  Diminishing legal risk will decrease the hesitancy of software companies and data centers to enter the arena of public health, and will therefore drive a competitive marketplace with lower costs for hospitals and insurance companies and, consequently, lower treatment costs for patients. (more…)

Posted On Sep - 11 - 2015 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Angela Daly – Edited by Katherine Zimmerman

1.      Introduction

This contribution will consider current moves in the European Union (EU) to legislate net neutrality regulation at the regional level. The existing regulatory landscape governing Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in the EU will be outlined, along with net neutrality initiatives at the national level in countries such as Slovenia and the Netherlands. The new proposals to introduce enforceable net neutrality rules throughout the EU will be detailed, with comparison made to the recent FCC proposals in the US, and the extent to which these proposals can be considered adequate to advance the interests of Internet users.

2.      Existing regulatory landscape in the EU

Various provisions from existing EU telecoms regulation are relevant to net neutrality. This regulatory framework has promoted intra-platform competition by stimulating competition at the retail, consumer-facing level for fixed line telecoms, rather than inter-platform competition between different technologies such as cable and copper wires — a feature of the US regulatory landscape. EU telecoms regulation has pursued a ‘technology neutral’ policy, more concerned with the extent to which markets are competitive than the type of technology used to deliver services. If a market is not competitive, then ex ante regulation will be applied with the idea that the regulation will no longer be needed once competition has been achieved, and market-based solutions suffice.

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Posted On Sep - 10 - 2015 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Newegg

By Kasey Wang – Edited by Yunnan Jiang and Travis West

TQP Development, LLC v. 1-800-Flowers.com, Inc., No. 2:11-CV-248-JRG at *1 (E.D. Tex. 2015).

On July 15, 2015, the District Court for the Eastern District of Texas ruled that online computer hardware retailer Newegg did not infringe on or induce infringement of TQP’s patent for an encryption scheme. After a jury found in favor of TQP, Judge Gilstrap granted Newegg’s Motion for Judgment as a Matter of Law.

At issue is U.S. Patent No. 5,412,730, Claims 1, 6, 8, and 9. TQP asserted that the patent covered any website using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) with the RC4 encryption cipher, a common combination for web retailers and other websites. After the jury awarded TQP $2.3 million but before Judge Gilstrap issued his final judgement, a different case involving the same TQP patent was decided in the District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. In this separate case, TQP Development, LLC v. Intuit Inc., No. 2:12-cv-180 (E.D. Tex. June 20, 2014), Judge Bryson “revised his earlier construction of a term” in TQP’s patent and “granted summary judgment of non-infringement.” Since the Intuit and Newegg websites use similar encryption schemes, Newegg filed a Notice of Subsequent Authority to inform Judge Gilstrap of this development. Judge Gilstrap ultimately granted Newegg’s Motion for Judgment as a Matter of Law and vacated the jury award.

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Posted On Aug - 23 - 2015 Comments Off READ FULL POST
Photo By: Brian Hawkins - CC BY 2.0

Photo By: Brian HawkinsCC BY 2.0

By Robert Frieden

Edited by Marcela Viviana Ruiz Martinez, Olga Slobodyanyuk and Yaping Zhang

I.          Introduction

In a relatively short time, key interconnection negotiations that make the Internet globally accessible have become less cooperative and more contentious. [1]At the Internet’s inception, Internet Service Providers (“ISPs”) providing essential bit switching and transmission functions largely embraced the twin goals of expanding connections and the number of users. [2] These ventures refrained from metering traffic and charging for carriage based on the assumption that traffic volumes roughly matched, or that traffic measurement was not worth the bother in light of external funding from government grants.  Most ISPs bartered network access through a process known as peering in lieu of metering traffic and billing for network use.[3]

As governments removed subsidies and commercial carriers invested substantial funds to build larger and faster networks, ISPs more accurately identified carriers and customers triggering higher costs and targeted them for rates increases. Currently the issue of cost causation has become a key commercial and regulatory policy issue, because of the potential for an ISP to disadvantage competitors as well as the possibility of traffic disconnections and service degradation when parties cannot agree on interconnection terms. [4]

(more…)

Posted On Aug - 15 - 2015 Comments Off READ FULL POST
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