A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news
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3D Systems and Formlabs Settled Two-Year Patent Dispute

By Yixuan Long – Edited by Yaping Zhang

On December 1, 3D Systems and Formlabs settled their two-year legal dispute over the 520 Patent infringement. Terms of the settlement are undisclosed. The patent covered different parts of the stereolithographic three-dimensional printing process, which uses a laser to cure liquid plastic. 3D Systems was granted the ‘520 Patent in 1997. Formlabs views the settlement as enabling it to continue its expansion and keep developing new products.

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Privacy Concerns in the Sharing Economy: The Case of Uber 

By Sabreena Khalid – Edited by Insue Kim

Recent revelations about Uber’s disconcerting use of personal user information have exposed the numerous weaknesses in Uber’s Privacy Policy. The lack of regulation in the area, coupled with the sensitive nature of personal information gathered by Uber, makes the issue one requiring immediate attention of policy makers.

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San Francisco Court Considers Google’s Search and Ad Services Free Speech

By Jens Frankenreiter – Edited by Henry Thomas

A San Francisco court dismissed a lawsuit against Google, treating Google’s search and advertisement services as constitutionally protected free speech. The lawsuit alleged an antitrust violation based on unfavorable treatment of a website in Google’s search results, and on the withdrawal of third-party advertisement from the website. In throwing out the lawsuit, the court applied California’s “anti-SLAPP” law, which allows quick dismissal of lawsuits against acts protected as free speech.

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EU Unitary Patent System Challenge Unsustainable: Advocate General

By Saukshmya Trichi – Edited by Ashish Bakshi

The Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union has rendered an opinion on Spain’s challenges to regulations implementing the European Unitary Patent System. The Advocate General opines that the challenges must be dismissed as the system is intended to provide genuine benefit in terms of uniformity and integration, and safeguard the principle of legal certainty, while the choice of languages reduces translation costs considerably.

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California Sex Offender Internet Identification Law Held Unenforceable

By Jesse Goodwin – Edited by Michael Shammas

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a district court ruling granting a preliminary injunction prohibiting of the Californians Against Sexual Exploitation (“CASE”) Act. In a unanimous ruling, a three-judge panel held that requiring sex offenders provide written notice of “any and all Internet identifiers” within 24 hours to the police likely imposed an unconstitutional burden on protected speech.

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Harvard Journal of Law & Technology Vol. 22.1 

Happy New Year!  The Digest Staff has returned to start the new year, and we’re thirlled to begin our coverage with the newest volume of the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology! Volume 22.1 is now available online, featuring: 

Rethinking Broadband Internet Access
Daniel F. Spulber & Christopher S. Yoo
Professors Spulber and Yoo discuss the regulation of broadband Internet access and the reasons why the traditional model based on telecommunication regulation is not applicable to broadband internet using a branch of mathematics called graph theory. Spulber and Yoo argue that the failure to properly adjust to this fact has led to current issues regarding the availability of last-mile broadband systems, most notably the recent conflict between the FCC and Comcast.

The Layers of Obviousness in Patent Law
Jeanne C. Fromer 
Professor Fromer reviews recent developments in the obviousness standard for patents arguing that the examination for obvious should be layered – the court should consider both the obviousness of the conception and the obviousness of the reduction to practice of the invention. She then discusses the implication of such a layered process on patentability of inventions in specific subject areas such as biotechnology and software.

Finding a Cure: The Case for Regulation and Oversight of Electronic Health Records Systems 
Sharona Hoffman & Andy Podgurski 
In the past couple of years, both Congress and the President have promoted programs that would incentivize the creation of electronic health records systems that would allow doctors easy access to all of a patient’s medical background. Professor Hoffman and Podgurski argue both that these systems should and will be created.  However, they also propose a system of regulation not only to ensure the privacy and security of patient records, but to make certain that the systems are reliable and contain accurate information.

Electronically Manufacture Law
Katrina Fischer Kuh
The advent of legal databases such as Westlaw and Lexis have substantially altered the way that legal research is performed. Professor Kuh uses principles of cognitive psychology to examine several specific differences in the approach to legal research and the consequences that these changes will have on the practice of law.

Toward a Culture of Cybersecurity Research
Aaron J. Burstein
Burstein argues that while cybersecurity researchers are making great stride in the protection of data, the progress in this field is actually being inhibited by statutory and informal measures aimed at protecting individual privacy. Burstein promotes the creation of research exception to federal privacy laws so that cybersecurity researchers may have access to data that improve security for all. 

Making Available as Distribution: File Sharing and the Copyright Act
John Horsfield-Bradbury
Student Note discussing several recent copyright cases, specifically, whether simply making a copyrighted work available, but not actually transferring it, counts as infringement.

The Web Difference: A Non-CDA-230 Rationale Against Liability for Online Reproduction of Third-Party Defamatory Content
Matt Sanchez 
Student Note arguing that, regardless of how courts and lawmakers end up interpreting the Communications Decency Act, internet speakers should be immune from liability for reproducing defamatory content. The Note supports this through an analysis of the unique nature and benefits of online speech and reproduction. 

Posted On Jan - 3 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Dear Digest Readers,

It’s once again that time of year: The Digest will be taking a short break in the coming weeks as our Staff Writers prepare for final exams and head home for a well-deserved holiday break. We’ll be back shortly after the New Year with the same quality and coverage you’ve come to expect in addition to brand-new student commentary. 

Also this winter, the Digest celebrates our one-year anniversary! Since January 2007 we have grown from a dedicated group of five to a staff of more than twenty-five; this past semester we’ve worked to bring our readers more content, faster than before, all while maintaining our high editorial standards. 

We sincerely hope you’ve enjoyed our coverage this year - Stay Tuned!  

- The Digest Staff 

Posted On Dec - 11 - 2008 Comments Off READ FULL POST

RDR Books Withdraws Appeal in Harry Potter Lexicon Case

RDR Books withdrew its appeal to the Second Circuit on Thursday, December 4th.  The trial court, in an opinion by Judge Patterson, had permanently enjoined its publication of a Harry Potter Lexicon book, along with awarding statutory damages to plaintiffs Warner Brothers and J.K. Rowling.

Anthony Falzone, of the Stanford Fair Use Project and counsel for the defendant, released a blog post entitled “Lexicon Resurrected,” noting that RDR plans to publish a new Lexicon.  The new manuscript addresses concerns expressed by J.K. Rowling at trial as well as those expressed in Judge Patterson’s opinion.  According to Mr. Falzone, both RDR and the author of the Lexicon, Steven Vander Ark, like the new manuscript much more than the old one.

As reported by the Associated Press, Neil Blair, a lawyer for J.K. Rowling’s literary agency, stated that he was “delighted that this matter is finally and favorably resolved and that J.K. Rowling’s rights – and indeed the rights of all authors of creative works – have been protected.”  “We are also pleased to hear that rather than continue to litigate, RDR have themselves decided to publish a different book prepared with reference to Judge Patterson’s decision.”

Previously: Harry Potter Lexicon Found to Infringe J.K. Rowling’s Copyright

Posted On Dec - 8 - 2008 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Federal Circuit Affirms Judgment Against Qualcomm, Limits Remedy of Patent Unenforceability
By Aaron Dulles – Edited By Stephanie Weiner
Qualcomm Inc. v. Broadcom Corp., Federal Circuit, December 1, 2008, No. 2007-1545 & 2008-1162
Slip opinion

On December 1, 2008, the Federal Circuit affirmed in part the District Court for the Southern District of California, no. 05-CV-1958, holding that Qualcomm breached its duty to disclose relevant video-compression technology patents during its participation in a standards-setting organization (“SSO”). However the Federal Circuit limited the scope of the remedy; rather than make the patent unenforceable against the world, the court held the patent unenforceable only against products compliant with the standard created by the SSO.

The judgment arises from a patent infringement suit brought against Broadcom in which Qualcomm asserted two patents concerning video compression technology. After a concealment effort that resulted in sanctions for litigation misconduct, it came to light that Qualcomm had participated in an SSO called the Joint Video Team (“JVT”) that was responsible for creating a video compression standard known as H.264. The H.264 standard was intended to be achievable at a baseline by anyone without requiring them to pay royalties. The court found that Qualcomm was required to disclose to the members of JVT any patents it held covering technology that “reasonably might be necessary” to practice the standard. Qualcomm was held to have waived its rights to the two patents by not disclosing those patents to JVT.

The case provides some clarity in a previously murky area: The Wall Street Journal Law Blog notes that this case clarifies the court’s willingness to find a duty to disclose in the SSO context, while Zusha Ellinson of The Recorder observes that it also clarifies the penalties for failing to disclose. The case is also being held up as a demonstration of the disastrous results of withholding evidence. (more…)

Posted On Dec - 6 - 2008 Comments Off READ FULL POST

District Court Enjoins Certain Advertising Practices; Keylogger Software Once Again Available
FTC v. CyberSpy Software, LLC, November 6, 2008, 6:08-cv-1872
Preliminary Injunction

On November 24th, Judge Presnell presided over a hearing regarding the temporary restraining order put in place by the court on November 6th. The preliminary injunction is significanty more limited than the original TRO, which had prevented CyberSpy from selling its “RemoteSpy” keylogger software entirely.

The new order primarily enjoins CyberSpy from

promoting, selling, or distributing RemoteSpy, or its equivalent, by means of informing or suggesting to customers that it may be, or is intended to be, surreptitiously installed on a computer without the knowledge or consent of the computer’s owner including . . . instructions for disguising the name of the executable file that accomplishes the installation and/or recommendation of the use of a stealth email service for sending the executable file to the remote computer.

The ruling focuses on restricting the methods CyberSpy may use to market or sell their product, but does allow the company to sell RemoteSpy once again.

Previously: District Court Halts Sales of Keylogger Software

Posted On Dec - 5 - 2008 1 Comment READ FULL POST
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3D Systems and Forml

By Yixuan Long – Edited by Yaping Zhang 3D Systems, Inc., ...

91ea09a6535666e18ca3c56f731f67ef_400x400

Privacy Concerns in

By Sabreena Khalid – Edited by Insue Kim Following scandals earlier ...

free-speech

San Francisco Court

By Jens Frankenreiter – Edited by Henry Thomas S. Louis Martin ...

European union concept, digital illustration.

EU Unitary Patent Sy

By Saukshmya Trichi – Edited by Ashish Bakshi Advocate General’s Opinion ...

computer-typing1

California Sex Offen

By Jesse Goodwin – Edited by Michael Shammas Doe v. Harris, ...