A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news
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Insuring Patents

By Yaping Zhang – Edited by Jennifer Chung and Ariel Simms

Despite its increasing availability, patent insurance—providing defensive protection against claims of patent infringement and funding offensive actions against patent infringers—continues to be uncommon. This Note aims to provide an overview of the patent insurance landscape.

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Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 Seeks to Establish Federal Cause of Action for Trade Secrets Misappropriation

By Suyoung Jang – Edited by Mila Owen

Following the Senate Judiciary Committee’s approval in January of the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016, the Committee has released Senate Report 114-220 supporting the bill. The bill seeks to protect trade secret owners by creating a federal cause of action for trade secret misappropriation.

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Federal Circuit Flash Digest

By Evan Tallmadge – Edited by Olga Slobodyanyuk

The Linked Inheritability Between Two Regions of DNA is an Unpatentable Law of Nature

HP Setback in Challenging the Validity of MPHJ’s Distributed Virtual Copying Patent

CardPool Fails to Escape an Invalidity Judgment But Can Still Pursue Amended Claims

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Amicus Brief by EFF and ACLU Urging Illinois State Sex Offender Laws Declared Unconstitutional under First Amendment

By Yaping Zhang – Edited by Mila Owen

With the Illinois Supreme Court gearing up to determine the constitutionality of the state’s sex offender registration statute, two advocacy non-profits have filed amicus briefs in support of striking the law down.

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Flash Digest: News in Brief

By Gia Velasquez – Edited by Ken Winterbottom

Federal Court Grants Uber’s Class Action Certification Appeal

Independent Contractor Classification of Uber Drivers May Violate Antitrust Laws

Self-Driving Car Will Be Considered Autonomous Driver

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Federal Circuit Rules for Crocs on Appeal in ITC Patent Dispute
By Sharona Hakimi – Edited by Steven Primeaux

Crocs, Inc. v. ITC, Appeal 2008-1596 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 24, 2010)
Slip Opinion

On February 24, 2010, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reversed and remanded a patent decision by the U.S. International Trade Commission concerning Crocs shoes. In what has become a trend in high-profile design patent cases, Judge Rader provided guidance on claim construction and the application of the ordinary observer test. Rader held that Crocs’ utility patent No. 6,993,858 (“the ’858 patent”) was not obvious and that the three other companies remaining in the litigation did in fact infringe Croc’s design patent No. D517,789 (“the ’789 patent”). The Federal Circuit remanded the case to the ITC to determine appropriate remedies.

The case arose in 2006 when Crocs, the maker of colorful plastic clog footwear, sued eleven companies for allegedly copying its shoe designs. Three companies remain in the litigation: Double Diamond Distribution, Ltd., the maker of Dawg shoes; Holey Soles Holdings, Inc.; and Effervescent, Inc., which makes Waldies Comfy Clogs. The ITC had held that Crocs’ ’858 patent for “breathable footwear pieces” was invalid for obviousness and that the companies did not infringe the ’789 patent because there were only “minor differences.” On appeal, the Federal Circuit reversed.

Inventive Step blog provides a legal analysis of the court’s decision, Law.com provides a summary of the case, and David Musker of Class99.com offers a brief overview of Judge Rader’s decision. (more…)

Posted On Mar - 1 - 2010 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Davis Doherty

Google Executives Answer for the Sins of Their Users in Italy

PCWorld reports that on Feburary 24, an Italian court convicted three Google executives for violating privacy laws, handing down six-month suspended sentences to each. The ruling arose after a video depicting the bullying of a boy with Down Syndrome was posted to Google Video Italia; Google removed the clip within hours of receiving a complaint from the Italian police, two months after it was first uploaded. Under Italian law, Internet content providers, but not Internet service providers, may be held liable as publishers of user-generated content.

Ars Technica reports on criticism that the decision strikes a blow to Internet freedom. As the New York Times explains, some observers connect the conviction to Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s interest in seeing a potential competitor to his media monopoly hindered. The executives plan on appealing the decision.

Businesses Give Yelp a Negative Review, File Class Action

Two class action law firms filed a lawsuit against Yelp Inc. on February 23 on behalf of a nationwide class of small businesses. The plaintiffs allege that Yelp, whose website allows users to post reviews of local businesses, “runs an extortion scheme in which the company’s employees call businesses demanding monthly payments, in the guise of ’advertising contracts,’ in exchange for removing or modifying negative reviews appearing on the website.” The WSJ Law Blog discusses the complaint, and the Bits Blog at the New York Times provides a response from Yelp. The case, Cats and Dogs Animal Hospital Inc. v. Yelp Inc., is currently pending in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

Strike One for ACTA?

On February 21, BoingBoing and Computerworld reported on the alleged leak of a draft chapter from the secretive negotiations surrounding the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (“ACTA”). Included in the alleged draft is a call for ACTA signatories to establish third party liability for infringement of intellectual property rights, which would allow rights-holders to bring suit against an Internet service provider who “knowingly and materially” aids infringement. The document calls for a requirement that ISPs implement user policies along the lines of a “three strikes rule,” which allows a provider to terminate a user’s Internet access after sending two warning letters. The European Commission expressed opposition to any agreement that would create an obligation to disconnect users.

Posted On Feb - 28 - 2010 Comments Off READ FULL POST

California Superior Court Enters Judgement in Anti-SLAPP Suit
By Debbie Rosenbaum – Edited by Steven Primeaux

MagicJack, LP v. Happy Mutants LLC, Case No. CIV 091108 (Sup. Ct. Cal. Marin County, Jan. 5, 2010)
Opinion (hosted by Boing Boing)

On January 5, 2010, the Superior Court of California for the County of Marin entered judgment against plaintiff MagicJack, reiterating its May 2009 holding that MagicJack had not established a probability of prevailing on its claims against Boing Boing and ruling that Boing Boing was entitled to legal fees and costs resulting from MagicJack’s lawsuit. In May, Boing Boing had moved to strike MagicJack’s claims under California’s anti-SLAPP (“strategic lawsuit against public participation”) rule. In its May 2009 holding against MagicJack, the court first noted that MagicJack’s claims targeted protected speech activity because Boing Boing’s statements “involve consumer information affecting a large number of persons.” The court then observed that posting on the Boing Boing site “provides information about [MagicJack's] product not only to the ‘substantial’ number of people who have already purchased the device, but also to other consumers who might be considering purchasing such a device.”

The court’s judgment is available here. The May 2009 ruling is available here. Gizmodo provides an overview of the case. Boing Boing also provides a full account of the events along with hosting all legal documents. (more…)

Posted On Feb - 27 - 2010 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Board of Patent Appeals affirms rejection of Pfizer’s broadest patent claim to Viagra
By Abby Lauer – Edited by Frank Sabatini

Ex parte Pfizer, Inc., Appeal 2009-004106 (B.P.A.I. Feb. 12, 2010).
Slip Opinion

On February 12, the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences affirmed a Patent Examiner’s rejection of claim 24 of Pfizer’s patent on the erectile dysfunction (ED) drug Viagra.

The Board held that claim 24 of the patent was anticipated in the prior art by descriptions of the herb Yin Yang Huo (Horny Goat Weed). In addition, the Board invalidated the claim based on the judicially created doctrine of obviousness-type double patenting, a doctrine that seeks to prevent unjustified extension of the right to exclude that is limited by the twenty-year patent term. In holding as it did, the Board rejected some of the Examiner’s reasoning but agreed with his ultimate decision to invalidate the claim.

PatentlyO provides an overview of the case. BusinessWeek discusses the impact of the decision on Pfizer and its competitors Eli Lilly & Co. and Bayer AG, the makers of ED drugs Cialis and Levitra respectively. (more…)

Posted On Feb - 24 - 2010 Comments Off READ FULL POST

School Punishment of Online Speech: Evans v. Bayer
By Stuart K. Tubis – Edited by Frank Sabatini

Evans v. Bayer, No. 08-61952-CIV-GARBER (S.D. Fla. February 12, 2010)
Slip Opinion

The District Court for the Southern District of Florida granted in part and denied in part defendant’s motion to dismiss. The court dismissed the claim for injunctive relief to prevent Bayer from maintaining records of the suspension and to compel him to revoke the suspension nunc pro tunc. The court held that it cannot compel someone in her personal capacity to take official action. Nonetheless, the court denied defendant’s motion to dismiss the claim for nominal damages, holding that the action was “off-campus activity” and protected by the First Amendment.

A NY Times article provides a general overview of the case. Wired and CNN also provide summaries of the case with limited legal analysis. Jon Katz writes in approval of the opinion emphasizing the frequent underprotection of First Amendment rights in schools. (more…)

Posted On Feb - 22 - 2010 1 Comment READ FULL POST
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