A student-run resource for reliable reports on the latest law and technology news
http://jolt.law.harvard.edu/digest/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/joltimg.png

Flash Digest: News in Brief

By Anne Woodworth

UK Court Allows Safari Users to Sue Google over Privacy Settings

FTC Responds to Allegations that it Ignored Staff Recommendations to Sue Google

Citigroup Report Criticizes Law Firms for not Reporting Hacking

Read More...

http://jolt.law.harvard.edu/digest/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/joltimg.png

Federal Circuit Rejects En Banc Review of Infringement Willfulness Standard

By Paulius Jurcys – Yaping Zhang

The Federal Circuit rejected a motion for en banc review of a patent infringement case evaluating the willfulness standard and whether the standard should be changed in order to meet the interpretation provided by the Supreme Court in the Octane decision.

Read More...

http://jolt.law.harvard.edu/digest/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/joltimg.png

The FCC’s Net Neutrality Rules on Protecting and Promoting Open Internet

By Shuli Wang – Edited by Yaping Zhang

Two weeks after voting on regulating broadband Internet service as a public utility, on March 12, the Federal Communications Commission (”FCC”) released a document (the FCC Order and Rules) on net neutrality, which reclassifies high-speed Internet as a telecommunications service rather than an information service, thus subjecting Internet service providers (ISPs) as common carrier to regulations under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934. The purpose of the new rules is to ensure the free flow of bits through the web without paid-for priority lanes and blocking or throttling of any web content.

Read More...

http://jolt.law.harvard.edu/digest/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/joltimg.png

White House releases administration discussion draft for Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights Act of 2015

By Lan Du – Edited by Katherine Kwong

On February 27, 2015, President Obama released an administration draft of a proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights Act. The proposed bill’s stated purpose is to “establish baseline protections for individual privacy in the commercial arena and to foster timely, flexible implementations of these protections through enforceable codes of conduct developed by diverse stakeholders.”

Read More...

http://jolt.law.harvard.edu/digest/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/joltimg.png

Federal Circuit Flash Digest: News in Brief

By Patrick Gallagher

Federal Circuit Affirms Denial of AT&T Motion to Extend or Re-open Filing Period for Appeal in Patent Infringement Suit

In Patent Suit Against Apple, Federal Circuit Affirms in Part, Reverses in Part

Federal Circuit Reverses DNA Sequencing Technology Patent Construction

Read More...

The Federal Circuit Provides Protection to Medical Diagnostics
By Brittany Blueitt – Edited by Caity Ross

Prometheus Labs., Inc. v. Mayo Collaborative Servs., Case No. 2008-1403 (Fed. Cir. Sept. 16, 2009)

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (“Federal Circuit”) reversed the ruling of the United States District Court for the Southern District of California granting summary judgment of invalidity of U.S. Patents 6,355,623 (“the ’623 patent”) and 6,680,302 (“the ’302 patent”) under 35 U.S.C. § 101.

Circuit Judge Lourie delivered the opinion of the court, holding that patents claiming a method of treatment were drawn to patentable subject matter based on transformative administering and determining steps of the process. In so holding, the court noted that the “key issue for patentability” is “whether a claim is drawn to a fundamental principle or an application of a fundamental principle.” Prometheus Labs., Inc. v. Mayo Collaborative Servs., No. 2008-1403, slip op. at 8 (Fed. Cir. Sept. 16, 2009).

Patently O provides an overview of the case. Patent Docs features a thorough analysis of the decision. (more…)

Posted On Oct - 3 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Dear Readers -

Digest is back! Our site has been down the past 3 weeks due to a server crash, but thanks to our wonderful online editors, it is back up and running. We appreciate your patience and apologize for any inconvenience our downtime may have caused. We will be publishing all of the content we have produced during our time offline in the next couple of days.

Thank you for continuing to read the site – we look forward to a great Fall semester filled with the same quality of content you have come to expect.

Best,

Digest Masthead

Posted On Oct - 3 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST

CAFC Requires a Clear and Convincing Intent to Deceive
By Adrienne Baker – Edited by Stephanie Young
In re Bose Corp., No. 2008-1448, 2009 WL 2709312 (Fed. Cir., Aug. 31, 2009).
Opinion

On August 31, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (“CAFC”) reversed and remanded the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (“TTAB”) decision, which ruled that fraud is committed when a registrant or applicant makes material misrepresentations it knows or should have known to be false or misleading.  The CAFC held the TTAB applied the should-have-known standard too broadly and thus ruled a registrant or applicant must have specific intent to deceive the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in order to fraudulently acquire a trademark.  The evidence supporting the registrant’s or applicant’s intent to deceive must be clear and convincing.  The CAFC ruling significantly limits, if not overturns, Medinol v. Neuro Vasx, Inc., 67 U.S.P.Q.2d 1205 (T.T.A.B. 2003), in which the TTAB adopted the should-have-known standard.

The TTABlog provides an overview of the case.  Allen’s Trademark Digest, in addition to providing a detailed history of trademark fraud, criticizes the decision and asserts that the Bose holding implies that registrants and applicants have no duty of candor.  Furthermore, the article asserts the CAFC ruling is contrary to the Lanham Act and the Trademark Law Revision Act (“TLRA”) statutory definitions of “use.” (more…)

Posted On Sep - 14 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST

By Andrew Jacobs

ISPs Found Liable for Websites’ Trademark and Copyright Infringement

Computerworld and Ars Technica report that on August 28, a federal jury handed down a $32.4 million judgment against two ISPs that hosted websites selling counterfeit Louis Vuitton products. Louis Vuitton successfully argued on a theory of contributory infringement, overcoming the ISPs’ claims of immunity under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s “safe harbor” provisions. Evidence that the ISPs had received and failed to respond to notices of the illegal activity from Louis Vuitton was key to the case.

EU to Investigate Oracle/Sun Deal

On September 3, the European Union’s antitrust regulators announced plans for a formal investigation of Oracle’s planned buyout of Sun Microsystems, The Washington Post reports. The investigation will center on the competitive consequences of “the world’s biggest proprietary database company . . . tak[ing] over the world’s leading open-source database company.” The European Commission will come to a ruling on the deal by January 19; the U.S. Department of Justice has already approved it.

Authors Voice Privacy Concerns in Objection to Google Settlement

A group of authors and publishers filed an objection to the proposed settlement between The Authors’ Guild and Google Book Search (GBS), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) reported on September 8. A fairness hearing regarding the settlement is set for next month. In the objection, prepared by EFF, the ACLU, and the Samuelson Clinic at UC Berkeley School of Law, the authors assert that GBS’s collection of personally identifiable information regarding users’ habits will having a chilling effect on readership. Limited information retention and strict disclosure standards are among the authors’ specific demands.

Posted On Sep - 13 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST

Martek Biosciences Corp. v. Nutrinova Inc.

By Debbie Rosenbaum – Edited by Stephanie Young
Martek Biosciences Corp. v. Nutrinova Inc., 2008-1459, -1476 (CAFC Sept. 3, 2009)
Opinion

On September 3, 2009, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware’s jury verdict finding that Martek’s patents were valid and infringed, but reversed the points of error Martek asserted on cross appeal. The Federal Circuit (“CAFC”), sitting as an expanded five-member panel: 1) upheld the district court’s denial of Lonza’s motions for judgment as a matter of law (“JMOL”); 2) found that the district court’s exclusion of Lonza’s prior inventorship evidence was appropriate; 3) upheld the district court’s construction of the term “non-chloride sodium salt”; 4) reversed the district court’s finding that two claims of the ’567 patent were invalid as a matter of law; and 5) expanded the district court’s limited construction of the claim term “animal” in the ’244 patent to include humans.

Briefs and relevant court documents are available here. The District Court’s 2007 decision may be found here. Patently-o and Patent Hawk both provide a discussion of merits. Patently-o and IP Watchdog discuss the significance of the five-judge panel. (more…)

Posted On Sep - 12 - 2009 Comments Off READ FULL POST
  • RSS
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • GooglePlay
Unknown

Flash Digest: News i

By Anne Woodworth UK Court Allows Safari Users to Sue Google ...

e222580_includeB

Federal Circuit Reje

By Paulius Jurcys – Yaping Zhang Order: Halo Electronics, Inc. v. ...

600px-NetNeutrality_logo.svg_

The FCC’s Net Neut

By Shuli Wang - Edited by Yaping Zhang THE FCC 15-24 ...

13399-surveillance_news

White House releases

By Lan Du – Edited by Katherine Kwong Administration Discussion Draft: ...

Unknown

Federal Circuit Flas

By Patrick Gallagher Federal Circuit Affirms Denial of AT&T Motion to ...