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Archive for the ‘Privacy’ Category

DRIP Bill Expands UK’s Data Surveillance Power

By Yixuan Long – Edited by Insue Kim

House of Lords passed the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill (“DRIP”) on July 17, 2014. DRIP empowers the UK government to require all companies providing internet-based services to UK customers to retain customer metadata for 12 months. It also expands the government’s ability to directly intercept phone calls and digital communications from any remote storage. Critics claim the bill goes far beyond what is necessary and its fast-track timeframe prevents meaningful discussion.

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Posted On Jul - 22 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

 

Flash Digest: News in Brief

By Patrick Gutierrez

Senate passes bill to make cell phone unlocking legal

ABA urges lawyers to stop pursuing file sharing lawsuits

FBI cautions that driverless cars may be used to assist criminal behavior

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Posted On Jul - 21 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

Flash Digest: News in Brief

By Olga Slobodyanyuk

BP Fails to Trademark the Color Green in Australia

The FTC Sues Amazon over Children’s Purchases in Apps

Leaked Code Reveals that NSA is Targeting Users of Privacy Services

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Posted On Jul - 15 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

The PCLOB’s Recommendations for a More Reasonable Surveillance Program
By Max Kwon – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

The PCLOB issued a report analyzing the legal and policy implications of Section 702 of the FISA. The Board issued recommendations addressing various concerns, such as targeting and tasking, U.S. person queries, and upstream and “about” collection. Although the Board unanimously concluded that the core program of Section 702 is both reasonable and valuable, the report appears to be largely condemned by civil liberties advocates and scholars.

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Posted On Jul - 14 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST

Supreme Court: Police Officers Need a Warrant to Search an Arrestee’s Cell Phone
By Anton Ziajka – Edited by Sarah O’Loughlin

On June 25, 2014, the Supreme Court decided that police officers “must generally secure a warrant before conducting . . . a search of the information on a cell phone” seized from an individual who has been arrested. Slip op. at 10. Writing for a unanimous Court, Chief Justice Roberts found that an officer’s search of a cell phone “implicate[s] privacy concerns far beyond those implicated by the search of . . . physical items.” Id. at 17.

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Posted On Jul - 7 - 2014 Add Comments READ FULL POST
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DRIP Bill Expands UK

By Yixuan Long – Edited by Insue Kim HL Bill 37 ...

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Federal Circuit Gran

By Kyle Pietari – Edited by Insue Kim VirtualAgility, Inc., v. ...

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Ninth Circuit Reject

By Sheri Pan – Edited by Insue Kim Fox Broadcasting Company, ...

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Flash Digest: News i

By Patrick Gutierrez Senate passes bill to make cell phone unlocking ...

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Federal Circuit Flas

By Amanda Liverzani Dismissal of Trademark Registration Opposition Affirmed Despite Pronunciation ...